Space

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  • NBC cameraman catches a UFO was then interrogated by FBI on 22nd August 2014

    Latest UFO sightings
    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:10 pm
    This is a clip of a news broadcast from August 22, 2014 – NBC (KSN) Cameraman, Brandon Mallory, shot the footage in 2002. He says he didn’t notice the object when filming, but when he went back to edit the video he just happened to pause it on one of the seven frames that it […]
  • Rocket ‘Anomaly’ Blamed For Putting European Navigation Satellites Into Wrong Orbits

    Universe Today
    Elizabeth Howell
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:40 am
    The fifth and sixth Galileo navigation satellites launch Aug. 22, 2014 from French Guiana. Credit: European Space Agency An independent investigation committee is looking at why two European navigation satellites are in the wrong orbits following their launch from French Guiana last week. While the first part of the launch went well, officials said telemetry from the satellites showed that the satellites were not where they were supposed to be. The probe is ongoing, but officials believe it is related to a stage of the Soyuz rocket that hefted the satellites into space. (...)Read the rest of…
  • The Crew That Never Flew: The Misfortunes of Soyuz 11 (Part 1)

    Space Safety Magazine
    AmericaSpace
    8 Aug 2014 | 5:59 am
    More than 40 years ago, the world’s first space station—Salyut 1, a “salute” to Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space —was launched into orbit by the Soviet Union. In April 1971, it was visited by Soyuz 10, but a fault with the docking prevented the three cosmonauts from entering the station. Following corrective actions, the... Read more → The post The Crew That Never Flew: The Misfortunes of Soyuz 11 (Part 1) from AmericaSpace appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Tesla Motors and Panasonic have signed agreement to build Gigafactory

    Space Industry News
    William W.
    1 Aug 2014 | 5:49 am
    Panasonic Corporation and Tesla Motors, Inc. have signed an agreement that lays out their cooperation on the construction of a large-scale battery manufacturing plant in the United States, known as the Gigafactory. According to the agreement, Tesla will prepare, provide and manage the land, buildings and utilities. Panasonic will manufacture and supply cylindrical lithium-ion cells and invest in the associated equipment, machinery, and other manufacturing tools based on their mutual approval. A network of supplier partners is planned to produce the required precursor materials. Tesla will…
  • Soyuz 1, The Tragic Death Of Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov

    Space Safety Magazine
    AmericaSpace
    13 Aug 2014 | 11:38 am
    Late in April 1967, an unusual announcement was made by the Soviet news agency, Tass. A few days earlier, cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov had been launched into orbit aboard the new Soyuz spacecraft. In time, it was hoped that Soyuz would demonstrate rendezvous, docking, space station operations and possibly expeditions to the Moon. Chief Designer Sergei Korolev... Read more → The post Soyuz 1, The Tragic Death Of Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov from AmericaSpace appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
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    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News

  • EASA Decides Against Engine Ash Intake Standards

    8 Sep 2014 | 12:38 pm
    A version of this article appears in the September 8 issue of Aviation Week & Space Technology. read more
  • Oshkosh, By The Numbers

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:58 pm
    read more
  • GAMA Names Archer Director of Engineering/Airworthiness

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:58 pm
    The General Aviation Manufacturers Association named Jonathan Archer director of engineering and airworthiness. Archer brings 24 years of aviation industry experience to his new role, formerly serving as an associate with Booz Allen Hamilton where he provided support to both the FAA and Joint Planning and Development Office. There he helped facilitate a pilot study involving safety management systems for FAR Part 21 design and manufacturing organizations as well as on NextGen air traffic management initiatives. read more
  • New Guinness Record

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:58 pm
    read more
  • FAA Moves Toward International Review of Helicopter Standards

    1 Sep 2014 | 1:58 pm
    The FAA is taking the next step toward a rewrite of FAR Part 27 and Part 29 standards, planning to establish an international “forum” to look at possible changes to the standards for helicopters. The agency in February 2013 solicited comments on potential interest for realigning the standards, including whether the weight- and passenger-based thresholds should be re-evaluated. Part 27 is currently restricted to helicopters with a maximum weight of 7,000 lb. or nine or fewer passenger seats. read more
 
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    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense

  • Japan mulls enhancing missile detecting capability

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Tokyo, Japan (XNA) Aug 26, 2014 Japan is mulling to further and effectively use space to detect early signs of ballistic missile so as to boost its defense capabilities, local media reported on Saturday. The Japanese Defense Ministry hopes to promote empirical research with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and also considered to set up a special force for space surveillance within the Self-Defense Forces, Ja
  • R-7 Intercontinental Ballistic Missile

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Moscow (RIA Novosti) Aug 27, 2014 On August 21, 1957, the USSR successfully launched the R-7/SS-6 Sapwood intercontinental ballistic missile, which was developed by experts from Special Design Bureau (OKB) No. 1, under the supervision of Chief Designer Sergei Korolev. The two-stage R-7 ICBM could deliver one thermonuclear warhead to just about any region of a theoretical enemy's territory. This new formidable weapons syste
  • Top Iran official, Saudi FM discuss 'terrorism'

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (AFP) Aug 26, 2014 Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal discussed Tuesday regional developments and the fight against Islamic State jihadists with a senior Iranian official visiting his country's longtime regional rival, an Iranian diplomat said. The visit by Iran's Deputy Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian to the city of Jeddah was the first by a high-level official from Shiite Iran to Sunni Sa
  • Delivery by drone

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Boston MA (SPX) Aug 27, 2014 In the near future, the package that you ordered online may be deposited at your doorstep by a drone: Last December, online retailer Amazon announced plans to explore drone-based delivery, suggesting that fleets of flying robots might serve as autonomous messengers that shuttle packages to customers within 30 minutes of an order. To ensure safe, timely, and accurate delivery, drones would
  • Iran provided weapons to Iraq's Kurds: Barzani

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Arbil, Iraq (AFP) Aug 26, 2014 Iran was the first country to provide Iraq's embattled autonomous Kurdish region with weapons to fight off jihadist-led militants, president Massud Barzani said on Tuesday. "The Islamic Republic of Iran was the first state to help us... and it provided us with weapons and equipment," Barzani said at a joint news conference with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. Militants led
 
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    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy

  • Hungary Sells T-72 Tanks to…?

    Joe Katzman
    26 Aug 2014 | 11:37 am
    Hungarian T-72(click to view full) The Hungarian Ministry of Defence has announced that they’ve sold 58 T-72 tanks to a Czech company, Excalibur Defense Ltd., who has begun transporting them into the Czech Republic. Under the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE Treaty), the Czech firm will face resale limitations, and they must also comply with certain Hungarian laws. The sale is a bit of a mystery, but some local reports suggest a possible explanation… T-72M4 CZ(click to view full) Hungary has about 30+ T-72M1 tanks in service, and the 58 tanks are likely to be…
  • Aerospace, Excelled: The USA’s Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Joe Katzman
    26 Aug 2014 | 10:36 am
    AEDC at work: X-29(click to view full) The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), named for U.S. Air Force pioneer Gen. Henry “Hap” Arnold, bills itself as “The World’s Premier Flight Simulation Test Facility.” Nearly half of the AEDC’s 58 test facilities are unique in the U.S., and 14 are unique in the world. These specialized test facilities have played a crucial role in the development and sustainment of virtually every high performance aircraft, air-to-air and air-to-ground weapon, missile, and space system in use by all four of the U.S. military…
  • Don’t Touch Their Junk: USAF’s SSA Tracking Space Debris

    Fred Donovan
    26 Aug 2014 | 10:01 am
    Space Fence concept(click to view full) Space is big. Objects in space are very dangerous to each other. Countries that intend to launch objects into space need to know what’s out there, in order to avoid disasters like the 2009 collision of 2 orbital satellites. All they need to do is track many thousands of man-made space objects, traveling at about 9 times the speed of a bullet, and residing in a search area that’s 220,000 times the volume of Earth’s oceans. The US Air Force Materiel Command’s Electronic Systems Center at Hanscom Air Force Base in Massachusetts…
  • JMR-FVL: The US Military’s Future “Helicopters”?

    Joe Katzman
    26 Aug 2014 | 9:38 am
    The future is now(click to view full) The JMR-TD program is the science and technology precursor to the Department of Defense’s estimated $100 billion Future Vertical Lift program, which is expected to replace between 2,000-4,000 medium class UH-60 utility and AH-64 attack helicopters after 2030. In reality, FVL will fall far short of that number if it ever goes ahead, but those figures are the current official fantasy. While they’re at it, the Pentagon wants breakthrough performance that includes the same hovering capability as smaller armed scout helicopters, and a 100+ knot…
  • US Defense Workforce Shrinkage, In Numbers

    Olivier Travers
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:28 am
    Politico reviewed SEC filings from major US defense contractors and found that “The number of employees at the five largest U.S. defense firms has dropped 14% from a peak in 2008 – and 10% over the past decade.” Lockheed Martin shrunk its workforce the most, in absolute (-31,000) and relative (-21%) terms. Maintenance & Readiness – Or Lack Thereof USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) had its flight deck just resurfaced but the non-skid coating doesn’t meet safety standards, which will likely delay the ship’s next deployment. Stars & Stripes. Der Spiegel…
 
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    Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

  • Russia May Continue ISS Work Beyond 2020

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Moscow (RIA Novosti) Aug 26, 2014 Russia may continue working at the International Space Station (ISS) beyond 2020, Izvestia newspaper reported Monday. "The issue of Russia's participation at the ISS after 2020 remains open, but there is a 90-percent chance that the state's leadership will agree to participate in the project further," the paper wrote citing a source at Russia's Federal Space Agency Roscosmos. Russian
  • Regulating Asteroid Mining

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Bethesda MD (SPX) Aug 26, 2014 The idea of mining asteroids is definitely in vogue. In the past few years commercial space advocates have been pursuing new private-sector space business activities. Profiting from orbital operations is not a new idea. Commercial space activities started in the early 1960s, with the launch of the first geosynchronous communications satellites. Many thought these early commercial space ven
  • NASA Completes Battery of Tests on Composite Cryotank

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Washington DC (SPX) Aug 27, 2014 NASA has completed a complex series of tests on one of the largest composite cryogenic fuel tanks ever manufactured, bringing the aerospace industry much closer to designing, building, and flying lightweight, composite tanks on rockets. "This is one of NASA's major technology accomplishments for 2014," said Michael Gazarik, NASA's associate administrator for Space Technology. "This i
  • Australia approves GPS project

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Canberra, Australia (UPI) Aug 26, 2014 The Australian government has approved a project to upgrade its military's global positioning system capability and its protection against jamming. The project, which has a cost of about $27.9 million, was announced this week by Minister for Defense David Johnston. "The government recognizes that to ensure the ADF (Australian Defense Force) remains viable and robust, we need to i
  • Same-beam VLBI Tech monitors Chang'E-3 movement on moon

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:23 pm
    Shanghai, China (SPX) Aug 27, 2014 By using the same-beam VLBI technology, differential phase delay successfully monitored the lunar rover's movement during the Chang'E-3 mission when rover and lander was carrying out the tasks of separation and took photos of each other. The sensitivity of rover motion monitoring was between 50-100mm.Furthermore, relative position between rover and lander was precisely measured by taking t
 
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    Science@NASA Headline News

  • Evidence for Supernovas Near Earth

    26 Aug 2014 | 4:37 pm
    A NASA sounding rocket has confirmed that the solar system is inside an ancient supernova remnant. Life on Earth survived despite the nearby blasts.
  • Candidate Comet Landing Sites Identified

    26 Aug 2014 | 7:57 am
    The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission has chosen five candidate landing sites on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for its Philae lander. Philae's descent to the comet's nucleus, scheduled for this November, will be the first such landing ever attempted.
  • New Horizons Crosses the Orbit of Neptune

    25 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    NASA’s Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft has traversed the orbit of Neptune. This is its last major crossing en route to becoming the first probe to make a close encounter with distant Pluto on July 14, 2015.
  • Exoplanet Measured with Remarkable Precision

    18 Aug 2014 | 8:51 am
    Astronomers are not only discovering planets around distant suns, they are also starting to measure those worlds with astonishing precision. The diameter of a super-Earth named "Kepler 93 b" is now known to within an accuracy of 1%.
  • Beautiful Morning Conjunction

    15 Aug 2014 | 5:58 pm
    Set your alarm for dawn! Venus and Jupiter are converging for a spectacular conjunction in the early morning sky.
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    Universe Today

  • Boeing Completes All CST-100 Commercial Crew CCiCAP Milestones on Time and on Budget for NASA – Ahead of Competitors

    Ken Kremer
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Boeing unveiled full scale mockup of their commercial CST-100 ‘Space Taxi’ on June 9, 2014 at its intended manufacturing facility at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The private vehicle will launch US astronauts to low Earth orbit and the ISS from US soil. Credit: Ken Kremer – kenkremer.com In the ‘new race to space’ to restore our capability to launch Americans to orbit from American soil with an American-built commercial ‘space taxi’ as rapidly and efficiently as possible, Boeing has moved to the front of the pack with their CST-100 spaceship by completing all…
  • Australian Astronomy Envy: This Video Is Like A Telescope Brochure

    Elizabeth Howell
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:55 am
    Performing observations in Australia is on many astronomers’ bucket lists, and this video timelapse shows you precisely why. Famous, world-class observatories, dark sky and the beautiful desolation of the desert combine in this award-winning sequence shot by Alex Cherney and posted on Vimeo. (...)Read the rest of Australian Astronomy Envy: This Video Is Like A Telescope Brochure (83 words) © Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: australia, video timelapse Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
  • Rocket ‘Anomaly’ Blamed For Putting European Navigation Satellites Into Wrong Orbits

    Elizabeth Howell
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:40 am
    The fifth and sixth Galileo navigation satellites launch Aug. 22, 2014 from French Guiana. Credit: European Space Agency An independent investigation committee is looking at why two European navigation satellites are in the wrong orbits following their launch from French Guiana last week. While the first part of the launch went well, officials said telemetry from the satellites showed that the satellites were not where they were supposed to be. The probe is ongoing, but officials believe it is related to a stage of the Soyuz rocket that hefted the satellites into space. (...)Read the rest of…
  • Extreme Weather is Linked to Global Warming, a New Study Suggests

    Shannon Hall
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    In 2013, a blocking pattern over Alaska caused a record-breaking heat wave. Credit: Earth Observatory Extreme weather is becoming much more common. Heat waves and heavy rains are escalating, food crops are being damaged, human beings are being displaced due to flooding and animals are migrating toward the poles or going extinct. Although it has been postulated that these extreme weather events may be due to climate change, a new study has found much better evidence. (...)Read the rest of Extreme Weather is Linked to Global Warming, a New Study Suggests (443 words) © Shannon Hall for Universe…
  • 5 Landing Site Candidates Selected for Rosetta’s Historic Philae Comet Lander

    Ken Kremer
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:10 pm
    Five candidate sites were identified on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for Rosetta’s Philae lander. The approximate locations of the five regions are marked on these OSIRIS narrow-angle camera images taken on 16 August 2014 from a distance of about 100 km. Enlarged insets below highlight 5 landing zones. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA Processing: Marco Di Lorenzo/Ken Kremer Story updated The ‘Top 5’ landing site candidates have been chosen for the Rosetta orbiters piggybacked Philae lander for humankind’s first attempt to land on a…
 
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    Space

  • Veteran Space Shuttle Astronaut Steven Nagel Dies At 67

    Scott Neuman
    23 Aug 2014 | 10:42 am
    The Air Force colonel was among the first group selected by NASA to train for the space shuttle program. He went on to fly four missions, two as commander.» E-Mail This
  • In Search Of Alien Life? Seek Out The Smog

    Geoff Brumfiel
    22 Aug 2014 | 1:06 pm
    One of the worst byproducts of our industrial society is air pollution. It's a global problem that humans have yet to get under control. One scientist thinks we might not be alone, though. Alien civilizations may be polluting their worlds, and that pollution might be one way to detect them.» E-Mail This
  • Scientists Searching For Alien Air Pollution

    Geoff Brumfiel
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:12 am
    Looking for extraterrestrial smog may be a good way to search for alien intelligence, according to a Harvard researcher.» E-Mail This
  • When Venus Was Filled With Venusians — 50 Billion Of Them

    Robert Krulwich
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:49 am
    Look up at the night sky and ask, "Anybody there?" Then consider this answer (from the 1830s): There are 22 trillion individuals in our solar system.» E-Mail This
  • If You're Born In The Sky, What's Your Nationality? An Airplane Puzzler

    Robert Krulwich
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:03 am
    Suppose two Chinese parents get on an Australian airplane and, while flying over U.S. territory, they have a baby on the plane. Can that baby be an American citizen?» E-Mail This
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    The Space Review

  • The Grand Tour finale: Neptune

    25 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    This week marks the 25th anniversary of Voyager 2's flyby of Neptune, completing the initial reconnaissance of the solar system's four large planets. Andrew LePage recounts the development of the "Grand Tour" that was topped off by the Neptune encounter.
  • The unsettled launch industry

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:59 am
    Since the early 2000s, the commercial launch industry had been dominated by three companies. Now, Jeff Foust reports, those companies are facing serious challenges from new entrants, who themselves are dealing with issues of their own.
  • Orbital manoeuvres in the dark: Apollo 11's UFO

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:58 am
    A new biography of Neil Armstrong offers an answer to a question raised by the Apollo 11 mission: what was the flashing light astronauts reported seeing trailing their spacecraft on the way to the Moon? Dwayne Day examines if that answer makes sense.
  • The downhill slide of NASA's "rocket to nowhere"

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:57 am
    A GAO report last month argued that NASA's Space Launch System faces serious cost and schedule risks. Rick Boozer argues that this is the latest sign that the heavy-lift rocket is doomed.
  • An outer space solution to the Russia-Ukraine conflict

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:56 am
    This week, the presidents of Russia and Ukraine are scheduled to meet in an effort to resolve the crisis between those two nations. Vid Beldavs suggests that the two nations should set aside their differences and work with the EU and others on major space projects instead.
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    Space Politics

  • Air Force starts search for an RD-180 replacement

    Jeff Foust
    26 Aug 2014 | 9:12 am
    Although the supply of Russian-built RD-180 engines that power the first stage of the Atlas V do not appear to be in the same level of jeopardy as feared earlier this year—United Launch Alliance took delivery of two of those engines last week—the US Air Force is starting to lay the groundwork for development of a domestic replacement engine. Last week, the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) issued a request for information (RFI) regarding development of a new booster engine. “The Air Force has relied upon foreign sources for booster propulsion systems in the…
  • House gearing up for CR to last until December

    Jeff Foust
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:23 am
    With no sign of progress on appropriations bills stalled in the Senate, the House is making plans to pass a “clean” continuing resolution that will keep the government running at least into December, a top House member said this week. In an interview with the Capitol Hill publication Roll Call Wednesday in Philadelphia, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), chairman of the House Budget Committee, said that he expected the House to take up a CR when it reconvenes in early September that will fund the government “until Dec. 11 is what we’re thinking.” That CR will be a…
  • As China tests ASAT, US pushes multilateral space security efforts

    Jeff Foust
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:58 am
    In a speech at a US Strategic Command symposium last week, a top State Department official made the case again for various multilateral efforts to improve space security, even as China appeared to perform another test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon. Frank Rose, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance at the State Department, discussed space security efforts in an August 13 speech at the US Strategic Command Deterrence Symposium in suburban Omaha. Much of the speech was a broad overview of national space policy in the area of space security,…
  • Buzz Aldrin endorses candidate in Alaska Senate race

    Jeff Foust
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:21 am
    Republicans in Alaska are going to the polls today to select a candidate to run against incumbent Sen. Mark Begich (D) in the November general election. One of those candidates is hoping that a last-minute endorsement from a famous former astronaut who typically does not get involved in campaigns will help swing a few of those voters his way. The campaign of Mark Treadwell, the state’s current lieutenant governor, announced Monday that it had won the endorsement of Buzz Aldrin. “I have known and worked with Mead for close to thirty years, dating back to his first time advising…
  • The curious case of a deleted Forbes.com commentary on SpaceX

    Jeff Foust
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:19 am
    SpaceX is no stranger to both strong support and harsh criticism of its activities, particularly in political circles. Last month, for example, three members of the House of Representatives asked NASA for details on an “epidemic of anomalies” they claimed the company’s Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft have experienced. But the company’s decision early this month to establish a commercial launch site near Brownsville, Texas, generated praise from various officials, including US Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) and Rep. Filemon Vela (D-TX). One criticism of SpaceX, though,…
 
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    NASA Watch

  • SpaceX Delays AsiaSat 6 - Just To Be Doubly Certain

    Keith Cowing
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:17 pm
    SpaceX Update on AsiaSat 6 Mission "What we do want to triple-check is whether even highly improbable corner case scenarios have the optimal fault detection and recovery logic. This has already been reviewed by SpaceX and multiple outside agencies, so the most likely outcome is no change. If any changes are made, we will provide as much detail as is allowed under U.S. law."
  • Simple Astrobiology Questions NASA Can't/Won't Answer

    Keith Cowing
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:21 am
    NASA Still Won't Look For Existing Life on Mars (update), earlier post Keith's 31 July note: I obviously expected Jim Green to answer in the same cautious way that NASA has always answered this question - one I have asked again and again for the nearly 20 years. Instead, Green launched into a detailed description of all the things that the Mars 2020 rover could detect that have a connection with life. Much of what he said clearly referred to extant / existing life. Now THAT is cool. To clarify things I sent the following request to NASA PAO "Can the Mars 2020 rover detect extant/existing life…
  • Lots Of Websites ≠ Good Web Practice

    Keith Cowing
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:12 am
    When NASA Moves Its Websites to the Cloud, Everyone Watches, Nextgov "The space agency has more than 1,500 public-facing websites and 2,000 intranets, extranets and applications, and the agency's data offerings and holdings are huge. "These guys have probably the most expansive list of Web assets," Ananthanpillai said. "That's one of the reasons why everyone's looking at them for lessons learned."" NASA is Unable (and Unwilling) To Coordinate Its Websites, earlier post "So, NASA is paying to maintain two MSL websites and the web addresses they give out are different than the actual web…
  • Russia Changes its Mind on ISS Shutdown in 2020

    Keith Cowing
    25 Aug 2014 | 4:09 am
    Russia may carry on ISS project after 2020 - newspaper, Interfax "If we take a look at the relevant section of the federal space program, we will see that the Russian Academy of Sciences is the ISS project customer. Our American partners have said many times they wished to continue the ISS operations after 2020. When they heard our leaders saying that Russia wanted to close down the project in 2020, they fostered the interaction with scientists and made interesting propositions of works in the period after 2020. A yearlong mission of a U.S. astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut to the ISS is…
  • Not so Fast: Galileo Satellites in Wrong Orbit

    Marc Boucher
    23 Aug 2014 | 6:53 am
    Europe's Latest Galileo Satellites Injected Into Wrong Orbit After Launch, SpaceRef Business "An investigation is underway after yesterday's launch by Arianespace of a Soyuz rocket which left its twin payload of Europe's fifth and six Galileo GPS satellites in a lower wrong orbit. According to a statement released by Arianespace "complementary observations gathered after separation of the Galileo FOC M1 satellites on Soyuz Flight VS09 have highlighted a discrepancy between targeted and reached orbit." Galileo Launch, Initially Hailed as Success, Is a Failure, Space News Marc's note: After…
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    EurekAlert! - Space and Planetary Science

  • What lit up the universe?

    26 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (University College London) New research from UCL shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built.The study published today in the Astrophysical Journal Letters by UCL cosmologists Dr. Andrew Pontzen and Dr. Hiranya Peiris, together with collaborators at Princeton and Barcelona universities, shows how forthcoming astronomical surveys will reveal what lit up the cosmos.
  • Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe

    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (ESO) Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, and other telescopes, an international team of astronomers has obtained the best view yet of a collision that took place between two galaxies when the Universe was half its current age. They enlisted the help of a galaxy-sized magnifying glass to reveal otherwise invisible detail. These studies of the galaxy H-ATLAS J142935.3-002836 have shown that this complex distant object looks like the local galaxy collision, the Antennae Galaxies.
  • Collaboration aims to reduce, treat vision problems in astronauts

    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Houston) To reduce and better treat spaceflight-induced visual impairment, University of Houston optometrists are collaborating on a NASA study that examines ocular changes seen in astronauts. The research uses Optical Coherence Tomography to investigate eye changes in astronauts exposed to long-duration microgravity aboard the International Space Station. The NASA Ocular Health Study recently received Heidelberg Engineering's annual 2014 Xtreme Research Award.
  • NASA sees huge Hurricane Marie slam Socorro Island

    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Marie when its eye was just to the west of Socorro Island in the Eastern Pacific.
  • NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites gaze into Hurricane Cristobal

    25 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites have been providing views of the outside and inside of Hurricane Cristobal as it heads for Bermuda. The National Hurricane Center posted a Tropical Storm Watch for Bermuda as Cristobal heads in that direction.
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    collectSPACE Today In Space History

  • Restoring a retired rocket

    26 Aug 2014 | 4:30 pm
    For nine years, it has sat, separated into huge parts, waiting inside a World War II-era hangar in Ohio. On Tuesday (Aug. 26), the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force announced it was time to begin restoring its Titan 4B space launch vehicle so that it can be exhibited in the museum's fourth building opening in 2016. The more than 200-foot-tall rocket is the largest item the museum has restored and its curators are seeking help from those who worked on the retired Titan 4B program.
  • Beyond Neptune

    25 Aug 2014 | 1:30 pm
    In a cosmic coincidence evoking a space history connection, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft traversed the orbit of Neptune on Monday (Aug 25), 25 years to the day after Voyager 2 encountered the gas planet. The probe, on its way to a July 2015 flyby of Pluto, missed Neptune by 2.5 billion miles, but mission managers marked the milestone by sharing a new image of the planet and its moon Triton captured by New Horizons in July.
  • Mate-Demate demolition

    25 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    The iconic space shuttle Mate-Demate Device that has been a fixture at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., for the past 38 years is being dismantled, three years after the shuttle program ended and six years since it last supported turnaround operations after the last shuttle landing on the west coast. The 110-foot tall MDD structure supported 59 shuttle landings between 1977 and 2009.
  • Astronaut Steven Nagel, 1946-2014

    22 Aug 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Former astronaut Steve Nagel died on Thursday evening (Aug. 21) at age 67. A veteran of four spaceflights, Nagel first served as a mission specialist on STS-51G in 1985 and then piloted the space shuttle on STS-61A later that same year. He commanded his third and fourth missions, STS-37 and STS-55, in 1991 and 1993. In total, he spent more than 30 days in space.
  • 'Astronaut's Guide,' the sitcom

    19 Aug 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield's "Guide To Life On Earth" will be the basis for a new TV sitcom, Deadline Hollywood reported Tuesday (Aug. 19). ABC has committed to producing a pilot episode for the series about an "astronaut who's back from space and finds that re-entering domestic life might be the hardest mission he's ever faced." Penned and produced by the creative team behind "S#*! My Dad Says," Hadfield will be a consulting producer on the 'Astronaut's Guide' series.
 
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    Spacehack

  • Cities at Night

    Ariel Waldman
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:29 pm
    ISS Expedition 30, NASA Classify photos taken by astronauts on the International Space Station to create a map of light pollution around the world. Light pollution is artificial light (such as street lamps) that results in masking the night sky, making it difficult to see the stars that would otherwise naturally appear to the naked eye. Light pollution is bad not only for blocking our ability to see the Milky Way, but it also can disrupt natural ecosystems. Around 1,200,000 images were taken aboard the International Space Station as of February 2014. However, the number of classified images…
  • theSkyNet

    Ariel Waldman
    15 May 2014 | 6:11 pm
    NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA Use your spare computing power to process radio astronomy data. Data collected by one of several radio telescopes (Parkes, GALEX, Pan-STARRS1, and WISE) is sent to your computer as a small data packet ready for processing. theSkyNet consists of two main projects: SourceFinder, which is searching for the sources of cosmic radio waves, and POGS, which is generating a multi-wavelength galaxy atlas for the nearby universe. By having thousands of people donate their extra computing power, it is possible to simulate a single powerful machine capable of doing real and…
  • Asteroid Data Hunter

    Ariel Waldman
    23 Mar 2014 | 10:40 pm
    ESA 2010 MPS NASA needs your help in developing algorithms that can better identify asteroids that have the potential to impact the Earth. Ground-based telescopes around the world are scanning the sky for asteroids, however, correctly identifying asteroids amidst other noise can be a challenge. There is so much data captured by modern telescopes, that scientists are unable to individually verify each potential asteroid detected. New ways of autonomously detecting asteroids are needed. This challenge calls for the development of algorithms that can be used by present-day and future telescopes…
  • European Rover Challenge

    Ariel Waldman
    20 Mar 2014 | 6:02 pm
    NASA/JPL An international competition for university-level students/faculty to design, construct and operate a Mars rover. The competition challenges teams to create a Mars rover that can accomplish tasks in sample retrieval, “blind” terrain traversal, life support maintenance, and emergency repairs. Teams must design and build their own rover, but are allowed to use off-the-shelf components. A letter of intent to participate in the competition is due by April 30, 2014. Rovers are limited to costing no more than 15,000 EUR in parts, equipment and paid services. The competition…
  • Disk Detective

    Ariel Waldman
    30 Jan 2014 | 6:04 pm
    Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Comb the Milky Way looking for stars that could harbor planet-forming disks. Planets form and grow in rotating disks of gas, dust, and chunks of rock around young stars. These disks suggest that these stars are in the early stages of forming planetary systems. Learning more about these stars can show how our Solar System formed. Finding these disks, birthplaces and homes of planets, has been a major quest of astronomers for the last three decades. NASA’s WISE mission probably made images of thousands of disks. Alas, these disks are buried among images of millions…
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    The Daily Galaxy --Great Discoveries Channel: Sci, Space, Tech

  • Is Our 3-D Universe an Illusion? --"Everything Could Actually be Encoded in Tiny packets in Two Dimensions"

    dailygalaxy.com
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:44 am
    “We want to find out whether spacetime is a quantum system just like matter is,” said Craig Hogan, director of Fermilab’s Center for Particle Astrophysics and the developer of the holographic noise theory. “If we see something, it will completely change ideas about space we’ve used for thousands of years.” Much like characters on a television show would not know that their seemingly 3 - D world exists only on a 2 - D screen, we could be clueless that our 3 - D space is just an illusion. The information about everything in our universe could actually be encoded in tiny packets in…
  • "When the Visible Universe was Less than One Microsecond Old" --Researchers Simulate Birth of the Cosmos

    dailygalaxy.com
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:23 am
    When the universe was less than one microsecond old and more than one trillion degrees, it transformed from a plasma of quarks and gluons into bound states of quarks - also known as protons and neutrons, the fundamental building blocks of ordinary matter that make up most of the visible universe. Using a calculation originally proposed seven years ago to be performed on a petaflop computer, Lawrence Livermore researchers computed conditions that simulate the birth of the universe. The theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) governs the interactions of the strong nuclear force and predicts it…
  • Interstellar Space is a 'Quantum-Weirdness' Lab --"Organic Reactions Occurring that Shouldn't Exist"

    dailygalaxy.com
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    There may be a suite of organic chemical reactions occurring in interstellar space that astronomers hadn't considered. In 2012, astronomers discovered methoxy molecules containing carbon, hydrogen and oxygen in the Perseus molecular cloud, around 600 light years from Earth. But researchers were unable to reproduce this molecule in the lab by allowing reactants to condense on dust grains, leaving a mystery as to how it could have formed. The answer was found in quantum weirdness that can generate a molecule in space that shouldn't exist by the classic rules of chemistry. In short, interstellar…
  • Saturn's Titan --"The 'Rosetta Stone of the Origin of Life?”

    dailygalaxy.com
    25 Aug 2014 | 7:22 am
    Luckily for researchers, there is a possible laboratory in our solar system to help us better understand the conditions on Earth before life arose — a situation sometimes referred to as a “prebiotic” environment. That location is Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, that has fascinated researchers for decades, particularly after NASA’s Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Saturn in the 1980s. The missions revealed a moon completely socked in with haze, which is a different experience to those used to gazing at Earth’s airless, cratered moon. A recent finding revealed that…
  • "The Invisible Galaxies" --Radio Images of the Whirlpool Galaxy & Beyond

    dailygalaxy.com
    23 Aug 2014 | 8:55 am
    Unravelling the mysteries of magnetic fields is crucial to understanding how our Universe works. For too long, many of the big questions about magnetic fields have simply been untestable before this new era of radio astronomy. "This opens a new window to the Universe where we do not know what galaxies will look like", observes Rainer Beck, lead astronomer with the Max Planck Institute. "Maybe we will see how galaxies are magnetically connected to intergalactic space. This is a key experiment in preparation for the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA) that should tell us how cosmic magnetic…
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    Icarus InterstellarIcarus Interstellar | A nonprofit foundation dedicated to achieving interstellar flight by 2100.

  • Introducing Project Voyager – Interstellar Trajectory and Mission Planning Tool

    Andreas Tziolas
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:58 pm
      It is my pleasure to introduce you to Icarus’s latest research project: Project Voyager Voyager will be led by Project Leader Zach Fejes (zfejes@icarusinterstellar.org), who has built a team of Engineers, Physicists and coders, with objective to design a 2d/3d interstellar trajectory and mission planning tool from the ground up. Many of us met Zach at Starship Congress last year, where he stood out as a highly motivated and capable new recruit. The Toronto based team of 14 reearchers so far have already settled in and are working on Euler vs 4th order Runge Kutta approximations of…
  • Introducing Project Astrolabe – Navigating the Future of Civilization

    Andreas Tziolas
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:47 am
    [logo for Project Astrolabe by J. N. Nielsen] Project Astrolabe: Navigating the Future of Civilization J. N. Nielsen Introducing Project Astrolabe Icarus Interstellar will be adding Project Astrolabe to its programs, which will be concerned with the core issues of civilization’s evolution, longevity, and existential risk. It will be the purpose of Project Astrolabe to bring to the study of civilization in the universe the same active engagement that Icarus Interstellar brings to the design of interstellar spacecraft, and in so doing to shed light on the place of human civilization in the…
  • A Starship Worth Fighting For

    Andreas Tziolas
    25 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    There’s a ship out there without a name. Its been thought of by millions, conceived of, drawn, designed and re-imagined over and over. Some hold strongly to have thought of it first. Others profess to having built it. Others lay claim to the origins of the idea. This is a ship without a name. But we all know what it is, and where its going. It will travel through interstellar space. It will be headed to a nearby star system. It will carry with it over two thousand years of dreams, …and we would like it to look something like this:   This is Mark Rademaker’s IXS-Enterprise…
  • Research, Reduction, and Reaching for the Stars

    Buck Field
    7 Jun 2014 | 9:48 am
    A reaction to the Discovery article by Ian O’Neill entitled “Another Glimpse of ‘New Physics’ at the LHC?“ The LHC was built to usher in a new era in quantum cosmology. New eras are by definition the result of a revolutionary paradigm shift, now a long-clichéd term from its use and abuse in everything from business management at the Sloan School, to self-improvement cults. Nevertheless, the most influential historians of revolutions in physics rely on the concept of revolutionary paradigm change, and we may take them to be experts. Something these historians…
  • ISDC – Round Up

    Jessica Riley
    2 Jun 2014 | 1:24 pm
    A couple of weeks ago I attended the International Space Development Conference in LA. This was my first time attending the conference and I found it had a lot to offer. Many people involved with Icarus were present, gave talks, and generally provided thoughtful discussion in the sessions. My professional experience is heavily involved with creating physical spaces which encourage meaningful interactions, communication, and learning. I have assisted many professionals in the creation of compelling narratives for presentations and conferences and I have organized various conference, events,…
 
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    21st Century Waves

  • Time’s “Cold War II” Cover Suggests a New 1960s-style “Critical State”

    Dr. Bruce Cordell
    3 Aug 2014 | 11:52 pm
    The Cold War of the 1960s between Russia (i.e. the Soviet Union) and the U.S. was a time of major geopolitical stress (e.g. the Cuban Missile Crisis, which almost led to a nuclear war) and rapid economic expansion in the West (e.g., the JFK Boom, which resulted in the greatest prosperity up to that time) — that triggered the Moon Race and the first Space Age. According to Time magazine’s August 4, 2014 cover, “Cold War II — The West is Losing Putin’s Dangerous Game.” Click Although this is hardly a new idea — e.g., 6 years ago there were serious…
  • New USC astronautics course “Human Spaceflight” for Fall 2014

    Dr. Bruce Cordell
    4 Jun 2014 | 11:52 am
    Happy to announce that I’m teaching a new graduate course for the Department of Astronautical Engineering at USC this Fall on “Human Spaceflight.” University of Southern California New for FALL 2014 – ASTE 599, Human Spaceflight Instructor: Dr. Bruce Cordell Human spaceflight has become a dynamic international and commercial activity that promises to exceed even the 50-year old transformational space vision of President John F. Kennedy, which led to the first humans on the Moon in 1969. Engineers, scientists, and managers need to stay abreast of this arena as global needs…
  • Bruce’s ISDC 2014 Presentation — The New Apollo-level Space Age

    Dr. Bruce Cordell
    26 May 2014 | 3:13 pm
    It was a pleasure to be an invited speaker at the recent meeting of the International Space Development Conference (ISDC 2014) of the National Space Society on May 15 in Los Angeles. The Conference theme was A Space Renaissance, and my presentation — “The New Apollo-level Space Age” — was definitely in that spirit! CLICK For the ppt version CLICK: ISDC.2014.Cordell. The key points include: 1. A variety of long-term and current global indicators point to a new, international, Apollo-level Space Age (i.e., a Maslow Window) that is just around the corner. 2. Great…
  • State of the Wave: 10 Space Trends for 2014 – Getting Our Ducks in a Row for the New Space Age

    Dr. Bruce Cordell
    9 Mar 2014 | 9:34 pm
    2014 will be a “Year of Decision” in the U.S as a mid-term election will influence how rapidly the anticipated new Apollo-level international Space Age will arrive. Specifically, U.S. voters will decide if the status quo will continue for two more years or if a new balance of power will set the stage for a transformative, 1960s-style golden age of prosperity, exploration, and technology. The new face of space? Supermodel Kate Upton suggests how exciting zero-g can be! Click For a brief intro to how space exploration is likely to go ballistic in the near-term, see my 2012 Ad Astra…
  • Happy New Year 2014! …and the Top 10 for 2013

    Dr. Bruce Cordell
    31 Dec 2013 | 7:32 pm
    Happy New Year! PLEASE NOTE: This coming year’s “State of the Wave: 10 Space Trends for 2014″ will be appearing very soon! For 2013′s Trends, click: State of the Wave: 10 Space Trends for 2013 Also, you can listen to my most recent appearance (12/6/13) on “The Space Show,” click: http://www.thespaceshow.com/detail.asp?q=2137 Here are the Top 10 Posts for 2013: This is a special updated New Year’s edition of our readers’ favorite posts, based on the number of times each post was visited during 2013. All posts are clickable and include their…
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    MessageToEagle.com

  • Discovery Of The First Sacred Language: Fact Or Fiction?

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    So too the existence of carved "letters" or symbols. Some of our group saw markings on the rocks that looked decidedly artificial, but since the women who were responsible for recording the rocks were denied permission to move or even touch them...
  • Lloyd Pye's Enigmatic Starchild Skull: What The Doctors Say About It

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    The accumulated results were compared to a statistical analysis of 100 human skulls. This is another strong indication that the skull in question is unlike anything previously seen or investigated.
  • Did Ancients Master Levitation?

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    In many parts of the world there are enormous monoliths that even in this brilliant era of technology no advanced crane could possible raise. Our modern society is proud of its technological and scientific achievements, but we are forced to admit that our ancestors possessed unique knowledge we still cannot gain access to. This brings us to the intriguing question: "Did ancients master levitation?
  • Egyptian Core Drill Holes In Stone: Evidence Of Machining Before The Pharaohs

    26 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Egyptologists have done an amazing job of piecing together the history of Dynastic Egypt, but what they have failed to properly explain are the presence of certain anomalies, such as drill holes that we find in profusion, in hard stone such as rose granite (above) at many of the ancient sites.
  • Elongated Heads Of Native People On The North American West Coast

    25 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Many of you may be acquainted with the phenomenon of cranial deformation, and the presence of elongated skulls in Peru. However, the drawing above, from the 19th century, is of a child from the Columbia River area of Washington or Oregon on the west coast of the United States.
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    AmericaSpace

  • The Next Giant Leap for ESA: Rosetta Team Determining Possible Landing Sites for Philae

    Emily Carney
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    From the European Space Agency (ESA): “Artist’s impression of Rosetta’s lander Philae (front view) on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Philae will be deployed to the comet in November 2014 where it will make in situ observations of the comet surface, including drilling 23cm into the subsurface to extract material for analysis in its [...]
  • Taking Aim With ExoLance: A New Way to Search for Life on Mars

    Paul Scott Anderson
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:05 pm
    “Got Life?”—the ExoLance logo. Image Credit: Explore Mars Is or was there life on Mars? That is one of the biggest and most hotly debated questions in planetary science. The manner in which the evidence has been searched for is also a topic of much discussion. The Viking landers in the 1970s were the [...]
  • SpaceX Primed to Launch Second AsiaSat Mission in Three Weeks

    Ben Evans
    25 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    The AsiaSat-6 payload undergoes final processing, ahead of its launch on Tuesday, 26 August. Photo Credit: AsiaSat Three weeks after launching the AsiaSat-8 communications satellite, SpaceX is primed to deliver its sibling, AsiaSat-6, into geostationary transfer orbit at an altitude of 22,236 miles (35,786 km) on Wednesday, 27 August. The Hawthorne, Calif.-based launch services organization—headed by entrepreneur [...]
  • They Came From Outer Space! The Mystery of the Fast Radio Bursts

    Leonidas Papadopoulos
    24 Aug 2014 | 11:40 pm
    Artist’s impression of a fast radio burst appearing in the sky above the 64-m Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia. A handful of these elusive cosmic radio flashes, whose exact origin remains unknown, have been detected during the last decade. Image Credit: CSIRO/Harvard/Swinburne Astronomy Productions In 2007, David Narkevic, then a physics and political science [...]
  • Boeing’s CST-100 Completes CCiCap On Time and On Budget, Awaits NASA’s Commercial Crew Award Decision

    Mike Killian
    24 Aug 2014 | 6:45 pm
    Boeing recently completed the final two milestones under the company’s CCiCap agreement with NASA, making Boeing the first, and only, company to have completed their CCiCap program on time and on budget. Image Credit: Mike Killian / AmericaSpace / Boeing One of three commercial spacecraft currently being developed under a NASA-funded competition to replace [...]
 
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    Space Industry News

  • Scientists uses Cosmic Lens to view most distant Merging Galaxies

    William W.
    26 Aug 2014 | 10:21 am
    Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and many other telescopes on the ground and in space, an international team of astronomers has obtained the best view yet of a collision that took place between two galaxies when the Universe was only half its current age. They enlisted the help of a galaxy-sized magnifying glass to reveal otherwise invisible detail. These new studies of the galaxy H-ATLAS J142935.3-002836 have shown that this complex and distant object looks like the well-known local galaxy collision, the Antennae Galaxies. The famous fictional…
  • Researchers have created a 3D model of the Sun: from the core to the surface

    William W.
    26 Aug 2014 | 6:53 am
    A team at the Astrophysics, Instrumentation and Modeling Laboratory (CEA/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot) has successfully modeled, in 3D, the effects of gravity waves in an extremely comprehensive simulation of the Sun, from its nuclear core to its convective surface. The results make very highly precise information accessible and provide a rigorous and unprecedented description of the Sun’s internal dynamics. This research, published in Astronomy and Astrophysics, should make it possible to substantially refine theoretical models and to plan future space missions (Solar-Orbiter, Plato)…
  • China is sending a robotic rover to the Moon to bring back rock and soil

    William W.
    25 Aug 2014 | 2:26 pm
    China has been developing a Lunar landing craft that will land on the Moon in 2017 if all goes as planned. The lander will be equipped with instruments that will collect rock and soil samples and return them to Earth. They will first launch a test vehicle later this year that will enter and maintain a stable Lunar orbit before returning to Earth at an escape velocity of 11.2 km/second. The Chang’e 5 test vehicle arrived in Xichang from Beijing on and was transported to the Xichang Satellite Launch Center, according to the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for…
  • Rosetta Probe has successfully initiated orbit with Comet 67P

    William W.
    6 Aug 2014 | 12:36 pm
    After 12 years the ESA Rosetta Probe has established a successful orbit around a giant boulder in space. This is an historic occasion, this is the first time humanity has made orbit with a Comet. It’s target? A comet named 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.  Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and Rosetta now lie 405 million kilometres from Earth, about half way between the orbits of Jupiter and Mars, rushing towards the inner Solar System at nearly 55 000 kilometres per hour. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Courtesy: ESA The comet is in an elliptical 6.5-year orbit that takes it from beyond…
  • Tesla Motors and Panasonic have signed agreement to build Gigafactory

    William W.
    1 Aug 2014 | 5:49 am
    Panasonic Corporation and Tesla Motors, Inc. have signed an agreement that lays out their cooperation on the construction of a large-scale battery manufacturing plant in the United States, known as the Gigafactory. According to the agreement, Tesla will prepare, provide and manage the land, buildings and utilities. Panasonic will manufacture and supply cylindrical lithium-ion cells and invest in the associated equipment, machinery, and other manufacturing tools based on their mutual approval. A network of supplier partners is planned to produce the required precursor materials. Tesla will…
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    Space Facts

  • Ceres & Pluto Dwarf Planet Gifs

    Chris Jones
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:39 am
    Inspired by @spaceplasma’s solar system gifs I have had a go at a few of my own (completely ripped them off) for a  few of solar system objects that were missed out; the dwarf planets Pluto & Ceres. Thanks to @spaceplasma for pointing me in the direction of the right font and embarrassing errors in the planet profiles. […] The post Ceres & Pluto Dwarf Planet Gifs appeared first on Space Facts.
  • What is a Planet?

    Chris Jones
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:45 am
    Planets are among the many worlds and smaller objects that orbit the Sun. The formal definition of planet, as voted on by the International Astronomical Union in 2006, is as follows: A planet is a celestial body that (a) is in orbit around the Sun, (b) has sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid […] The post What is a Planet? appeared first on Space Facts.
  • How Big is the Sun? 1.3 Million Earths Visualised

    Chris Jones
    12 Aug 2014 | 5:32 am
    The Sun is large enough that approximately 1.3 million Earths could fit inside (if squashed in) or if the Earths retained their spherical shape then 960,000 would fit. But can you visualise that number of Earths? Get Started 1 100 1,000 Jupiter’s volume is roughly equal to 1,321 Earths, though Jupiter’s mass is equal to […] The post How Big is the Sun? 1.3 Million Earths Visualised appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Orbital Periods of the Planets

    Chris Jones
    18 Jun 2014 | 11:57 am
    How long are years on other planets? A year is defined as the time it takes a planet to complete one revelation of the Sun, for Earth this is just over 365 days. This is also known as the orbital period. Unsurprisingly the the length of each planet’s year correlates with its distance from the Sun as seen […] The post Orbital Periods of the Planets appeared first on Space Facts.
  • An Introduction to Backyard Observatories

    Mark
    15 May 2014 | 5:56 am
    The blog has been taken over by my friend Mark to talk about building an observatory in your garden and then using it as an excuse to not spend time with your family, if this is the sort of thing you’re into why not check out ManCaved.com for other ‘manly’ ideas for your domestic getaway. […] The post An Introduction to Backyard Observatories appeared first on Space Facts.
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    Space Safety Magazine

  • Space Safety Magazine, Issue 6, Winter 2013

    Merryl Azriel
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:36 am
      We knew this issue was going to spend a lot of time looking at Columbia. As we spoke with those who experienced the tragedy first hand as well as experts who have spent their careers analyzing it, it became clear that the message from Columbia was still highly relevant – and remains so today.  ... Read more → The post Space Safety Magazine, Issue 6, Winter 2013 from Merryl Azriel appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • How ISS Helps Save Lives

    Matteo Emanuelli
    21 Aug 2014 | 8:51 am
    If you are reading Space Safety Magazine, you probably know already the International Space Station, the human outpost in low Earth orbit where a crew of six astronauts lives, performing scientific research and advancing our understanding of the space environment. You know already that last year the ISS celebrated its 15th birthday in space. Since... Read more → The post How ISS Helps Save Lives from Matteo Emanuelli appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Soyuz 1, The Tragic Death Of Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov

    AmericaSpace
    13 Aug 2014 | 11:38 am
    Late in April 1967, an unusual announcement was made by the Soviet news agency, Tass. A few days earlier, cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov had been launched into orbit aboard the new Soyuz spacecraft. In time, it was hoped that Soyuz would demonstrate rendezvous, docking, space station operations and possibly expeditions to the Moon. Chief Designer Sergei Korolev... Read more → The post Soyuz 1, The Tragic Death Of Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov from AmericaSpace appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • The Crew That Never Flew: The Misfortunes of Soyuz 11 (Part 1)

    AmericaSpace
    8 Aug 2014 | 5:59 am
    More than 40 years ago, the world’s first space station—Salyut 1, a “salute” to Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space —was launched into orbit by the Soviet Union. In April 1971, it was visited by Soyuz 10, but a fault with the docking prevented the three cosmonauts from entering the station. Following corrective actions, the... Read more → The post The Crew That Never Flew: The Misfortunes of Soyuz 11 (Part 1) from AmericaSpace appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Space Medicine

    Matteo Emanuelli
    7 Aug 2014 | 9:10 am
    Space Medicine is a branch of medicine born in the ‘50s, to support the human space exploration in the hostile space environment. Not only the microgravity environment, but also the increased radiations and isolation, produce effects both on human body and minds that have not yet been fully understood in a long-term scale. Medicine in space,... Read more → The post Space Medicine from Matteo Emanuelli appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
 
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    Latest UFO sightings

  • NBC cameraman catches a UFO was then interrogated by FBI on 22nd August 2014

    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:10 pm
    This is a clip of a news broadcast from August 22, 2014 – NBC (KSN) Cameraman, Brandon Mallory, shot the footage in 2002. He says he didn’t notice the object when filming, but when he went back to edit the video he just happened to pause it on one of the seven frames that it […]
  • UFO formation leaving Earth on 24th August 2014

    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:06 pm
    New amazing video footage recorded from the ISS of multiple bright UFOs leaving Earth in formation on 24th August 2014.
  • Multiple UFOS flying above Melbourne, Australia in August 2014

    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:03 pm
    New amazing video footage from Lou of multiple UFO lights recorded in the sky above Melbourne, Australia in August 2014. Witness said: All recorded with a P8079HP & VARO Night vision tube – Melbourne Australia
  • Latest Crop Circles all over UK in August 2014

    admin
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:57 pm
    New interesting video footage of tree Crop Circles reported in UK in August 2014. Nettle Hill, nr Ansty, Warwickshire, United Kingdom. Reported 16th August. Ackling Dyke (2), nr Sixpenny Handley, Dorset, United Kingdom. Reported 22nd August Ironwell Lane, nr Stroud Green, Essex, United Kingdom. Reported 24th August.
  • Glowing UFO over Ocean Isle, North Carolina on 17th August 2014

    admin
    25 Aug 2014 | 4:09 pm
    New interesting video footage of a bright glowing UFO sighting recorded in the night sky above Ocean Isle, North Carolina on 17th August 2014 and reported in local TV news.
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    thinkofspace.com

  • Jupiter – New Observer Toolkit

    thinkofspace
    14 Aug 2014 | 8:19 am
    Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System, has a retinue of 63 satellites (at last count) and shields Earth from inbound comets. One of it’s moons, Europa, is suspected of haboring an ocean beneath its icy crust, one that has a very good chance of supporting life. Jupiter is a spectacular planet when seen in a telescope, sporting two prominent cloud bands and its Great Red Spot, a cyclonic storm system three times the size of Earth that has blown across Jupiter for over 300 years. Glistening like diamonds, the four largest satellites orbit the planet in a matter of days in a…
  • Universe Facts

    thinkofspace
    1 Aug 2014 | 3:50 am
    Universe Facts As always we like to keep you up to date with the latest news and articles. Check out the new article on Universe Facts now! If you want to stay ahead on all the space news and views make sure you subscribe to the blog!
  • What is a Black Hole?

    thinkofspace
    17 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Source: JPL/NASA (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA16695) What is a black hole? Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity predicted that black holes existed in 1916. A black hole is a point in space were gravity is so strong, caused by matter collapsing into a tiny space usually from a dying star, that not even light can escape. Due to no light escaping black holes are invisible. Only with incredibly powerful telescopes can black holes be detected. Black holes are usually detected by looking at neighboring stars and objects; this is because when a black hole is…
  • Lift Off for The Space Store!

    thinkofspace
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:16 am
    Lift Off for The Space Store! At thinkofspace.com we have just launched our new Space Store, we have put together some of the best books on space and the universe, with authors such as Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking and Brian Cox. These books will give the reader a mass of information on space and the universe, take a ride through our universe with Carl Sagan in his ground breaking book Cosmos. Professor Brian Cox in his Wonders of the Solar System and Wonders of the Universe books takes modern complex theories of the solar system and universe and delivers them in a simple, clear and concise way…
  • News Update – UK Spaceport

    thinkofspace
    15 Jul 2014 | 6:57 am
      The UK is taking a great leap into space with the unveiling of eight potential sites for the UK’s first spaceport. Reports are indicating that the UK would like the spaceport open in 2018. Once a potential site is picked, commercial space flight takes one step closer. Imagine taking a ride into space, now that would be cool, however initially very expensive with tickets proposed to be in the region of £100k. What a bang for your buck though, considering the advancements in flight the thought of being able to take a ride on spaceship without having to train for a long time and also…
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