Space

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  • SpaceX Wins Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award

    Space Safety Magazine
    Staff Writers
    6 Oct 2014 | 9:05 am
    The International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety has announced that this year’s Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award will go to Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) for safety accomplishments related to its Dragon vehicle. The award will be received at the 7th IAASS Conference Awards Gala Dinner by SpaceX Director of Risk and System Safety Michael Lutomski.... Read more → The post SpaceX Wins Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award from Staff Writers appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Asteroid Belt Facts

    Space Facts
    Chris
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:20 am
    What is the asteroid belt? The vast majority of asteroids in the solar system are found in a region of the solar system out beyond Mars. They form the Asteroid Belt. Others orbit in near-Earth space and a few migrate or are thrown out to the outer solar system by gravitational interactions. The four largest […] The post Asteroid Belt Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Cassini Watches Mysterious Feature Evolve in Titan Sea

    Space Industry News
    William W.
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:05 pm
    NASA‘s Cassini spacecraft is monitoring the evolution of a mysterious feature in a large hydrocarbon sea on Saturn’s moon Titan. The feature covers an area of about 100 square miles (260 square kilometers) in Ligeia Mare, one of the largest seas on Titan. It has now been observed twice by Cassini’s radar experiment, but its appearance changed between the two apparitions. Images of the feature taken during the Cassini flybys are available at: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18430 The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark…
  • Taking Minds on a Journey to Mars

    NYT > Space & Cosmos
    By KENNETH CHANG
    20 Oct 2014 | 12:25 pm
    In a dome on a Hawaiian volcano, NASA is financing a study to see how astronauts might deal with the stress and isolation of an interplanetary trip.
  • Honeywell Business Aviation Outlook

    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News
    27 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    View the PDF
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    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News

  • Honeywell Business Aviation Outlook

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    View the PDF
  • Bolen, Bunce: Keep Business Aviation Voice at Forefront

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    National Business Aviation Association President and CEO Ed Bolen and General Aviation Manufacturers Association President and CEO Pete Bunce believe business aviation is in a stronger position heading into debate on the next FAA reauthorization bill thanks to a concentrated effort by industry to educate lawmakers and the general public on the important role the industry plays in the national economy. read more
  • Calendar

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    Upcoming Events Oct. 27-29—23rd AVSEC World, Grand Hyatt  Hotel, Washington, D,C., www.iata.org/events/Pages/avsec.aspx Oct. 27-29—Crisis Communications in the Social Media Age, Conrad Istanbul Hotel, Istanbul, Turkey, www.iata.org/events/Pages/comms-conference.aspx Nov. 3-5—SpeedNews 19th Annual Regional & Business Aviation Industry Suppliers Conference, Montelucia, Paradise Valley (Scottsdale), Ariz., www.speednews.com/all/conferences read more
  • Sabreliner Bounces Back

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    Sabreliner, an iconic name in business jet aviation since the late 1950s, is making a comeback with ambitious plans to expand beyond maintenance and repair to provide aircraft rebuilds, refurbishments and engine overhauls. read more
  • Bob Youngreen

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    BOB YOUNGREEN joined United Rotorcraft, a division of Air Methods, as account manager within the global sales and marketing department. Youngreen has 30 years of industry experience, beginning as a technician for Rocky Mountain helicopters. There he supported utility and logging operations in the Western U.S. read more
 
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    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense

  • Aerostat surveillance system being evaluated by CBP

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Washington (UPI) Oct 23, 2014 U.S. Customs and Border Protection is evaluating a Lockheed Martin aerostat surveillance system along the border with Mexico. The system is the Persistent Threat Detection System, or PTDS, which is currently being used in Afghanistan by the U.S. Army for identifying threats and tracking insurgents. Lockheed Martin said it is providing operational support for the system's evaluati
  • Intelsat General To Study Commercialization of USAF Satellites

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Bethesda, MD (SPX) Oct 23, 2014 Intelsat General Corp. is one of four companies awarded a contract by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) to study the viability of using commercial facilities and operations expertise for the tracking, telemetry and command (TT and C) of government satellites. The goal of the contract, known as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN) Commercial Provisioning study, is to provide USAF Space C
  • Brazil, Argentina to negotiate over Gripen aircraft

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Gaviao Peixoto, Brazil (UPI) Oct 22, 2014 Brazil and Argentina are to begin negotiations over the purchase of Swedish-designed Gripen fighters to be manufactured in Brazil. The decision was announced in Brazil by visiting Argentine Defense Minister Agustín Rossi. Brazil's Ministry of Defense said the talks over the possible purchase of 24 Brazil-produced Gripens would include not only the conditions of purchase but also
  • Russian Bank Offers 5 Billion Rubles for GLONASS

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 21, 2014 The Russian state development bank Vnesheconombank (VEB) is set to offer financial support for domestic companies to develop projects using the GLONASS navigation system in Russia and abroad pending government approval, Izvestia reports. VEB's sister fund -"VEB Innovations" will set up the "GLONASS Fund" within the fourth quarter of this year; funds will be made available by next February-
  • ORNL research reveals unique capabilities of 3-D printing

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Oak Ridge TN (SPX) Oct 20, 2014 Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated an additive manufacturing method to control the structure and properties of metal components with precision unmatched by conventional manufacturing processes. Ryan Dehoff, staff scientist and metal additive manufacturing lead at the Department of Energy's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL,
 
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    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy

  • Poland Poised for Realistic but Low Profile Posture?

    Olivier Travers
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:19 am
    Poland has adopted [Defence24] a new national security strategy, which explicitly recognizes “a risk of local and regional conflicts in direct vicinity of Poland.” The Economist profiles Ewa Kopacz, Poland’s prime minister since last month, as a pragmatic leader likely to play it safe rather than use a confrontational tone in her dealings with Russia. Reuters has shown pictures of charred tanks in Eastern Ukraine which several analysts thought had to be Russian. Slovakia will purchase 2 C-27J transport aircraft, reports the Slovak Spectator. Future US Subs The US Navy is…
  • If Necessary, Alone: The Shield of Poland

    Joe Katzman
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:38 am
    In the wake of events in Georgia and Crimea, Poland has emerged as NATO’s key eastern bastion. The Tarcza Polski (Shield of Poland) aims to give it an advanced air defense system to match. Poland’s military rise has been slow, but steady. Smart economic policies have created growth, and a willingness to finance national defense is slowly improving their equipment. Combat deployments abroad to Iraq and Afghanistan have both sharpened training, and highlighted areas that still need fixing. Missile proliferation in the Middle East, American fecklessness, and a rearming Russia have…
  • Buy from the Pros: Poland Adds More German Tanks

    Joe Katzman
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Polish Leopard 2A4(click to view full) Germany is almost done selling off one of the world’s most impressive tank fleets, earning itself a solid market around the world in the process, and choking sales of competitive designs. In November 2013, Poland announced that it would buy a 2nd batch of Leopard 2 tanks from Germany, along with assorted other equipment. As usual, the package price was incredibly cheap: just EUR 180 million for 119 more tanks, plus range training fittings, machine guns, radios; and assorted armored tractors, cars, and trucks. Poland’s next question is what to…
  • AGM-158 JASSM: Lockheed’s Family of Stealthy Cruise Missiles

    Joe Katzman
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    JASSM-ER from B-1B(click to view full) The 2,000 pound AGM-158 JASSM (Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile) is intended to be a stealthy, inexpensive GPS/IIR (Global Positioning system/ Imaging InfraRed) guided cruise missile. It’s designed to attack well-defended targets without putting its carrier aircraft in the crosshairs of new long-range surface to air missile systems. JASSM has experienced a rocky development history, due to long-standing reliability issues. In 2005 it was threatened with cancellation following a series of poor test results. The program went through 2007 on an…
  • Aces High: Challenge Halts New 3DELRR Long-Range Ground Radar

    Fred Donovan
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    AN/TPS-75(click to view full) The US Air Force’s AN/TPS-75 radar has been in service since 1968. Threats have evolved, and they want to replace it as their main long-range, ground-based radar for detecting, identifying and tracking aircraft and missiles, then reporting them through the Ground Theater Air Control System. The US Marines are considering a similar move, to replace their own AN/TPS-59s. Hence the USA’s Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar (3DELRR, pron. “Three Dealer”). 3DELRR is intended to provide up to 35 radars for long-range surveillance,…
 
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    Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

  • China launches first mission to moon and back

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Beijing (AFP) Oct 24, 2014 China launched its first space mission to the moon and back early Friday, authorities said, the latest step forward for Beijing's ambitious programme to one day land a Chinese citizen on the Earth's only natural satellite. The unnamed, unmanned probe will travel to the moon, fly around it and head back to Earth, re-entering the atmosphere and landing, the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND) said in a statement.
  • Two families of comets found around nearby star

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Paris (SPX) Oct 24, 2014 Beta Pictoris is a young star located about 63 light-years from the Sun. It is only about 20 million years old and is surrounded by a huge disc of material - a very active young planetary system where gas and dust are produced by the evaporation of comets and the collisions of asteroids. Flavien Kiefer (IAP/CNRS/UPMC), lead author of the new study sets the scene: "Beta Pictoris is a very e
  • NASA's Fermi Satellite Finds Hints of Starquakes in Magnetar 'Storm'

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Washington DC (SPX) Oct 23, 2014 NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected a rapid-fire "storm" of high-energy blasts from a highly magnetized neutron star, also called a magnetar, on Jan. 22, 2009. Now astronomers analyzing this data have discovered underlying signals related to seismic waves rippling throughout the magnetar. Such signals were first identified during the fadeout of rare giant flares produced by mag
  • Organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere are intriguingly skewed

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Washington DC (SPX) Oct 24, 2014 While studying the atmosphere on Saturn's moon Titan, scientists discovered intriguing zones of organic molecules unexpectedly shifted away from its north and south poles. These misaligned features seem to defy conventional thinking about Titan's windy atmosphere, which should quickly smear out such off-axis concentrations. "This is an unexpected and potentially groundbreaking discovery,"
  • NASA-led study sees Titan glowing at dusk and dawn

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:14 am
    Greenbelt MD (SPX) Oct 24, 2014 New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one. The pair of patches was spotted by a NASA-led international team of researchers investigating the chemical m
 
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    Science@NASA Headline News

  • Sunset Solar Eclipse

    17 Oct 2014 | 4:45 pm
    On October 23rd, the Moon will pass in front of the sun, off-center, producing a partial solar eclipse visible in most of the United States.
  • 2014 Orionid Meteor Shower

    17 Oct 2014 | 11:10 am
    Earth is entering a stream of debris from Halley's Comet, parent of the annual Orionid meteor shower. Forecasters expect the shower to peak on Tuesday, Oct. 21st.
  • Where will New Horizons Go After Pluto?

    16 Oct 2014 | 5:36 pm
    Peering out to the dim, outer reaches of our solar system, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered three Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) the agency’s New Horizons spacecraft could potentially visit after it flies by Pluto in July 2015.
  • The Cloudy Future of Arctic Sea Ice

    15 Oct 2014 | 9:05 am
    As climate change continues to hammer Arctic sea ice, pushing back its summertime boundaries to record-high latitudes, NASA is flying an innovative airborne mission to find out how these developments will affect worldwide weather.
  • Evidence for Young Lunar Volcanism

    12 Oct 2014 | 10:15 pm
    NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has found strong evidence of geologically young volcanic activity on the moon. Some deposits appear to be less than 100 million years old, corresponding to Earth's Cretaceous period, the heyday of dinosaurs.
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    Universe Today

  • Google Exec hands Silicon Valley the Stratospheric Jump Record

    Tim Reyes
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Google’s Vice President of Search, Alan Eustace, has just smashed the altitude record for stratospheric skydiving. His liftoff was from Roswell, New Mexico is where the record was first set in 1960 by USAF Colonel Joseph Kittinger. (Credit: Paragon Space Development Corporation) Just a little over two years since Felix Baumgartner broke USAF Colonel Joseph Kittinger’s stratospheric jump record, Alan Eustace from Google has independently smashed the high altitude skydiving record again. This brings home to Silicon Valley a record that might stand for a while. Eustace took a minimalist…
  • Making Cubesats do Astronomy

    Tim Reyes
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Will cubesats lead to a new technological branch of astronomy? Goddard engineers are taking the necessary steps to make cubesat-sized telescopes a reality. (Credit: NASA, UniverseToday/TRR) One doesn’t take two cubesats and rub them together to make static electricity. Rather, you send them on a brief space voyage to low-earth orbit (LEO) and space them apart some distance and voilà, you have a telescope. That is the plan of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center engineers and also what has been imagined by several others. Cubesats are one of the big crazes in the new space…
  • Weekly Space Hangout – Oct. 24, 2014

    Fraser Cain
    24 Oct 2014 | 11:54 am
    Host: Fraser Cain (@fcain) Guests: Ramin Skibba (@raminskibba) (...)Read the rest of Weekly Space Hangout – Oct. 24, 2014 (12 words) © Fraser for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: Black Holes, Cassini, China, Fermi Satellite, Hubble, Kepler, MESSENGER, milky way, Moon, Orion, solar eclipse, space plane Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
  • This Is the Very First Photo of Earth From Space

    Jason Major
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:59 am
    The first photo of Earth from space was taken on Oct. 24, 1946 (Credit: White Sands Missile Range/Applied Physics Laboratory) These days we see photos of our planet taken from space literally every day. Astronauts living aboard the International Space Station, weather and Earth-observing satellites in various orbits, even distant spacecraft exploring other planets in our Solar System… all have captured images of Earth from both near and far. But there was a time not that long ago when there were no pictures of Earth from space, when a view of our planet against the blackness of the…
  • Comet Siding Spring Was Bleeding Hydrogen As It Sped By Mars

    Elizabeth Howell
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:30 am
    Comet Siding Spring shines in ultraviolet in this image obtained by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. Credit: Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics/University of Colorado; NASA As Comet Siding Spring passed close by Mars on Sunday (Oct. 19), NASA’s newest Mars spacecraft took a time-out from its commissioning to grab some ultraviolet pictures of its coma. What you see above is hydrogen, a whole lot of it, leaving the comet in this picture taken from 5.3 million miles (8.5 million kilometers). The hydrogen is a product of the water ice on the comet…
 
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    The Space Review

  • Close encounters of the top secret kind

    20 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    In 1969, a Soviet spy satellite passed closed to an American one. Dwayne Day examines whether this was a deliberate attempt by the Soviets to image the American satellite -- or even test an ASAT system -- or just a coincidence.
  • Commercial crew's extended endgame

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:59 am
    Last month, NASA awarded contracts for commercial crew systems that were expected to end months of uncertainty about the program's future. However, Jeff Foust reports that the uncertainty lingers today, as one company protests those awards while also working on alternative plans for its vehicle design.
  • Powering cislunar spaceflight with NEO powder

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:58 am
    NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission plans to use xenon as the propellant for ion propulsion systems that will nudge a small asteroid into lunar orbit. Ronald Menich argues that using NEO materials themselves is a more sustainable approach to developing long-term cislunar infrastructure.
  • Big data computing above the clouds

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:57 am
    Data centers, the essential if invisible component of cloud computing, require large amounts of power and cooling to operate effectively. Vid Beldavs describes one solution that would put cloud computing literally above the clouds, in orbit.
  • Review: Mars Rover Curiosity

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:56 am
    More than two years after landing, the Mars rover Curiosity has helped scientists make fundamental discoveries about the Red Planet. Jeff Foust reviews a book by the mission's chief engineer that examines the significant challenges NASA faced in developing the spacecraft.
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    NASA Watch

  • ATLAS Is Walking. Valkyrie Remains Hidden

    Keith Cowing
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:09 pm
    ATLAS robot gets closer to walking like a human, TechGenMag "When Boston Dynamics first revealed their ATLAS robot on July 11, 2013, the bipedal humanoid robot was a clunky, slow moving contraption tethered to a jumble of cords that performed a variety of controlled tasks awkwardly. Still, we were all impressed by the ATLAS robot's humanlike legs and frame that no doubt offered a tantalizing glimpse into the near future of robotics. Fast forward a year, and with help from the Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC), the ATLAS robot has received some serious programming…
  • Jumping From Near Space

    Keith Cowing
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:05 pm
    Record-breaking 135,908-ft Space Dive Sets Stage for Future of Space Travel Paragon Completes Record-Breaking Near-Space Dive Via High-Altitude Balloon "Today, after 34 months of intense planning, development and training, Alan Eustace, supported by Paragon Space Development Corporation (Paragon) and its Stratospheric Explorer (StratEx) team, made history with a near-space dive from a high-altitude balloon at approximately 135,000 feet. Eustace broke several records, including national record for highest exit altitude; world and national record for free fall under a drogue chute; national…
  • Problems With STEREO Behind Spacecraft (Updated)

    Keith Cowing
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:46 am
    STEREO Behind Spacecraft Experiencing Communication Problems (Updated with NASA Comments) "Communications with the STEREO Behind spacecraft were interrupted on October 1, immediately after a planned reset of the spacecraft performed as part of a test of solar conjunction operations. The cause of the anomaly is not yet known, though a sensor anomaly in the guidance and control system is suspected. Attempts to recover the spacecraft are continuing."
  • OECD Report: The Space Economy at a Glance 2014

    Keith Cowing
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:51 am
    OECD Report: The Space Economy at a Glance 2014 "The Space Economy at a Glance 2014 shows that while space budgets in the 34 OECD countries totalled USD 50.8 billion in 2013, down from USD 52.3 billion in 2008, the combined space budget of the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India and China) swelled to USD 24.0 billion from USD 16.5 billion over the same period.  Supply chains for spacecraft, launchers and parts are increasingly globalised, IT companies are becoming satellite operators and rapid growth in small satellite launches will mean more commercialisation of earth observation data."
  • Critique of OIG Review of SMD Mission Extension Process

    Keith Cowing
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:40 pm
    Letter From Clive Neal to NASA Inspector General Regarding NASA SMD Mission Extension Process Report "I am writing this open letter with regard to the Inspector General Report No. IG-15- 001 (hereafter "IG-Report") regarding the Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) Mission Extension Process that was released on 9 October of this year. In this report you highlighted the Planetary Science Division (PSD) for particular criticism because of its non-standardized approach to evaluating mission extensions. Having been part of the PSD 2012 Senior Review, and chair of the GRAIL and the PSD 2014 Senior…
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    EurekAlert! - Space and Planetary Science

  • Satellite catches lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 9

    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NOAA's GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.
  • NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan

    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn's moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth's poles.
  • NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous

    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the storm as it moved over open ocean.
  • Hinode satellite captures X-ray footage of solar eclipse

    23 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) The moon passed between the Earth and the sun on Thursday, Oct. 23. While avid stargazers in North America looked up to watch the spectacle, the best vantage point was several hundred miles above the North Pole. The Hinode spacecraft was in the right place at the right time to catch the solar eclipse. What's more, because of its vantage point Hinode witnessed a 'ring of fire' or annular eclipse.
  • NASA's Terra satellite shows a more organized Tropical Storm Ana

    22 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize. Ana appeared more rounded on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite as thunderstorms again circled the low-level center.
 
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    collectSPACE Today In Space History

  • HUBBLE@25

    23 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Marking 25 years of scientific discovery, the Hubble@25 temporary exhibit opens on Thursday (Oct. 23) underneath the space shuttle Enterprise at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York City. The exhibit, co-curated by astronaut Mike Massimino, features flown artifacts, artistic photos, and immersive experiences highlighting the history of the Hubble Space Telescope.
  • Shuttle doors shut

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:15 pm
    The California Science Center closed out the 'Go for Payload' phase of its future space shuttle Endeavour display plans on Tuesday (Oct. 21), shutting the two doors on the retired orbiter's cargo bay. Over the past three weeks, the science center outfitted the hold with a flown Spacehab module and replica parts to prepare Endeavour for its vertical exhibit, slated to open in 2018.
  • Alan Bean Plus Four

    20 Oct 2014 | 4:20 pm
    Tom Hanks imagines a modern-day bootstrap mission to the moon in "Alan Bean Plus Four," an original work of fiction in the current issue (Oct. 27) of "The New Yorker." The actor, who's no stranger to playing an astronaut, crafts a tale of four friends who travel around the moon in a way less complicated way than Alan Bean did aboard Apollo 12, 45 years ago this November.
  • 675 days in orbit

    17 Oct 2014 | 3:30 pm
    For almost two years, the U.S. Air Force's X-37B reusable space plane orbited the Earth conducting a secretive test mission. On Friday (Oct. 17), it returned to a landing in California after 675 days in space. The touchdown on a runway at Vandenberg Air Force Base marked the end of the X-37B program's third mission, with a fourth flight planned for 2015. Built by Boeing, the orbital test vehicle used on this mission previously flew in 2010.
  • Flight of the Phoenix

    15 Oct 2014 | 10:25 am
    As perhaps a patch before its time, the Apollo 7 crew's first idea for their mission's official insignia was to pay tribute to the fallen Apollo 1 crew. Overruled by NASA, the Phoenix-themed patch did not become a reality until 45 years later, when astronaut Walt Cunningham had it made as a commemorative emblem.
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    The Daily Galaxy --Great Discoveries Channel: Sci, Space, Tech

  • The Event Horizon of a Black Hole --"An Exit Door from Our Universe" (Today's Most Popular)

    dailygalaxy.com
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Once an object fall through the event horizon of a black hole, they’re lost forever. “It’s an exit door from our universe," said Shep Doeleman, assistant director at the MIT Haystack Observatory and research associate at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. "You walk through that door, you’re not coming back.” Supermassive black holes are the most extreme objects predicted by Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity — where, according to Doeleman, “gravity completely goes haywire and crushes an enormous mass into an incredibly close space.” In September of 2012, an…
  • Strange Triple Asteroid System Observed

    dailygalaxy.com
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:41 am
    “Combined observations from small and large telescopes provide a unique opportunity to understand the nature of this complex and enigmatic triple asteroid system,” said Franck Marchis, senior research scientist at the Carl Sagan Center of the SETI Institute. “Thanks to the presence of these moons, we can constrain the density and interior structure of an asteroid, without the need for a spacecraft’s visit. Knowledge of the internal structure of asteroids is key to understanding how the planets of our solar system formed.” Combining observations from the world’s largest telescopes…
  • China Launches its 1st Space Mission to the Moon and Back

    dailygalaxy.com
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    China launched its first space mission to the moon and back early Friday, authorities said, the latest step forward for Beijing's ambitious program to one day land a Chinese citizen on the Earth's only natural satellite. The unnamed, unmanned probe will travel to the moon, fly around it and head back to Earth, re-entering the atmosphere and landing, the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND) said in a statement. The module will be 413,000 kilometres from Earth at its furthest point on the eight-day mission. "The first stage of the first return…
  • "Will We Need an 'Alien' Telescope to Detect Earth's Twin?"

    dailygalaxy.com
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:58 am
    Almost 2,000 extrasolar planets have been discovered to date and this number is constantly increasing. Yet, we still know little about these alien worlds, especially their atmospheres. The atmospheres of terrestrial exoplanets could betray the presence of life on the planet, sparking NASA’s interest in acquiring the spectra that appears as starlight shines through these planetary atmospheres. A paper by Timothy Brandt and David Spiegel, exo-planetary scientists at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, details what is needed in a next generation telescope for it to be capable of…
  • Organic Molecules in Titan's Atmosphere Appear to Defy Conventional Thinking

    dailygalaxy.com
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:55 am
    While studying the atmosphere on Saturn’s moon Titan, scientists discovered intriguing zones of organic molecules unexpectedly shifted away from its north and south poles. These misaligned features seem to defy conventional thinking about Titan’s windy atmosphere, which should quickly smear out such off-axis concentrations. These newobservations give us new insights into how organic molecules, the building blocks of life, form and evolve in a planet-like environment. Titan is in some ways the most Earthlike body in the Solar System, with a thick atmosphere and prominent lakes, rivers, and…
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    TimeHuman

  • Is The Chupacabra Real?

    Admin
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:51 am
    Is the Chupacabra real? The video below explains the possible species connections the Chupacabra could have. For example, is it a rat/kangaroo mix? Or what? Is the Chupacabra a new species all together? Is it a cross between two species?Many of the sightings that are hyped in the media are always proven false. That doesn't mean the Chupacabra isn't real. Nature can do weird things, and the idea of strange mutations isn't a crazy one. Until caught, the Chupacabra will remain reclusive, and mythological. The truth is out there.
  • The Real Sounds Of Hell

    Admin
    28 Sep 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Researchers from a remote part of Siberia claim to have recorded real sounds from hell. They drilled a hole roughly 14 kilometers deep into earth's crust. The researchers noted an unusual amount of heat coming from the hole. After dropping ultra-sensitive microphones into the hole--to measure the earth's movements--they discovered strange feedback coming into the mics. The video below is a sample of what they recorded. It's the real sounds of hell. Maybe...If you get scared easily, don't watch the video. I warned you.'The last discovery was nevertheless the most shocking to our ears, so much…
  • Cold Weight Loss Benefits Without The Cold

    Admin
    7 Jun 2014 | 8:26 pm
    Brr-brr-brr! Scientists have discovered a way to make the body of mice burn calories as if they were exposed to the freezing cold. A potential future treatment for obesity in humans!White fat to brown fat Humans are born with a decent amount of brown fat. Brown fat is the fat best used for insulation from the cold. White fat stores energy, while brown fat is the energy burner--which comes in really handy when you want to lose some weight. Sadly, as we humans get older, brown fat seems to disappear. Ajay Chawla (UC), San Fran, and his team injected obese mice with interleukin-4 (a…
  • Most fascinating science news of the week (Dec 15, 2012)

    Admin
    15 Dec 2012 | 5:04 pm
    Here are some of the most fascinating science news stories of the week:CU-Boulder team develops swarm of pingpong ball-sized robotsUniversity of Colorado Boulder Assistant Professor Nikolaus Correll likes to think in multiples. If one robot can accomplish a singular task, think how much more could be accomplished if you had hundreds of them. Read more: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2012/12/14/cu-boulder-team-develops-swarm-pingpong-ball-sized-robotsAstronomers discover 'missing link' of black holes The discovery of a bingeing black hole in our nearest neighbouring galaxy,…
  • Geminid meteor shower live stream

    Admin
    13 Dec 2012 | 6:34 pm
    The Geminid meteor shower occurs on an annual basis, when the extinct comet 3200 Phaethon sprinkles the Earth with its debris tail. Get outside tonight between midnight and 3 a.m. to catch a glimpse of this amazing spectacle.Expect to see roughly 100+ meteors per hour during the peak at 2-3 a.m.If you can't get out to see Geminid, NASA will be live streaming the event via a camera at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Below is the embedded live stream:If you would like to go directly to the NASA live stream event, here's the link:…
 
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    Icarus Interstellar » Icarus Interstellar | A nonprofit foundation dedicated to achieving interstellar flight by 2100.

  • Interstellar Comparisons

    Adam Crowl
    1 Oct 2014 | 6:13 am
    Terraformed Venus (a Wikipedia Image) Travelling to the stars within a human lifetime via the known laws of physics requires energies millions of times more potent than a trip to Mars, for example. In our energy hungry modern world the prospect seems fanciful, yet we are surrounded by energies and forces of comparable scale. By taming those forces we will be able to launch forth towards the stars and save our civilization and our biosphere. How so? Consider the sunlight received every second by planet Earth, from the Sun. About 1.4 kilowatts of energy for every square metre directly facing…
  • A Plumber’s Guide to Starships, Part 3 – Thermal Properties of Materials

    Michel Lamontagne
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Materials are the bedrock upon which we can build starship designs. Outside of science fiction, there is no use postulating a starship drive that requires materials that do not, or cannot, exist. So this article is about materials: what they can do, what we hope future materials can do, and what we expect materials to never be able to do. Figure 1- Roman clay pipes. Modern vitrified clay pipes. Alumina ceramic pipes and linings. 2000 years of progress in materials. For a Starship plumber, the question boils down to: “What’s the best material for my pipes?” And the answer is the…
  • Introducing Project Voyager – Interstellar Trajectory and Mission Planning Tool

    Andreas Tziolas
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:58 pm
      It is my pleasure to introduce you to Icarus’s latest research project: Project Voyager Voyager will be led by Project Leader Zach Fejes (zfejes@icarusinterstellar.org), who has built a team of Engineers, Physicists and coders, with objective to design a 2d/3d interstellar trajectory and mission planning tool from the ground up. Many of us met Zach at Starship Congress last year, where he stood out as a highly motivated and capable new recruit. The Toronto based team of 14 reearchers so far have already settled in and are working on Euler vs 4th order Runge Kutta approximations of…
  • Introducing Project Astrolabe – Navigating the Future of Civilization

    Andreas Tziolas
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:47 am
    [logo for Project Astrolabe by J. N. Nielsen] Project Astrolabe: Navigating the Future of Civilization J. N. Nielsen Introducing Project Astrolabe Icarus Interstellar will be adding Project Astrolabe to its programs, which will be concerned with the core issues of civilization’s evolution, longevity, and existential risk. It will be the purpose of Project Astrolabe to bring to the study of civilization in the universe the same active engagement that Icarus Interstellar brings to the design of interstellar spacecraft, and in so doing to shed light on the place of human civilization in the…
  • A Starship Worth Fighting For

    Andreas Tziolas
    25 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    There’s a ship out there without a name. Its been thought of by millions, conceived of, drawn, designed and re-imagined over and over. Some hold strongly to have thought of it first. Others profess to having built it. Others lay claim to the origins of the idea. This is a ship without a name. But we all know what it is, and where its going. It will travel through interstellar space. It will be headed to a nearby star system. It will carry with it over two thousand years of dreams, …and we would like it to look something like this:   This is Mark Rademaker’s IXS-Enterprise…
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    AmericaSpace

  • Super-Hot Venus May Have Heavy Metal Frost

    Paul Scott Anderson
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Radar image of bright areas and dark patches in a swath of terrain in Ovda Regio going from lower to higher elevations. Image Credit: The Geological Society of America/Elise Harrington, Simon Fraser Univ. (LPI undergraduate intern)/Allan Treiman, LPI. Venus is one of the most inhospitable places in the Solar System, with temperatures hot enough [...]
  • Integral Component of Webb Space Telescope Undergoes, Survives ‘Deep Freeze’ Testing

    Emily Carney
    24 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    From NASA: “The view from inside NASA Goddard’s Thermal Vacuum Chamber shows the JWST [James Webb Space Telescope] heart being lowered by crane in preparation of weeks of space environment testing.” An essential component of the James Webb Space Telescope has just completed and survived vacuum testing in extremely cold conditions. Photo Credit: NASA/Chris [...]
  • NASA’s SMAP Mission Arrives at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Begins Final Preparations for Early 2015 Launch

    Leonidas Papadopoulos
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:30 pm
    Scheduled for launch in early 2015, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP mission, will track Earth’s water into one of its last hiding places: the soil. SMAP soil moisture data will, among other things, aid in predictions of agricultural productivity, weather and climate. Image Credit: NASA “Follow the water”: This theme has driven [...]
  • Saturn’s Moon Mimas May Have an Underground Ocean—or Just a Weird Core

    Paul Scott Anderson
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:58 pm
    Mimas, a cold, icy, and tiny moon of Saturn, may have a liquid water ocean below its heavily cratered surface. Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI It wasn’t that long ago that Earth was thought to be the only place in the Solar System capable of having liquid water oceans, but now we know of several moons that [...]
  • Russian Cosmonauts Breeze Through Four-Hour EVA

    Ben Evans
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:21 pm
    Max Surayev (bottom) and Aleksandr Samokutyayev (top) at the Pirs airlock during their EVA on Wednesday, 22 October. Photo Credit: NASA For the seventh time in 2014—and the third occasion in less than three weeks—a pair of spacewalkers toiled outside the International Space Station (ISS) earlier today (Wednesday, 22 October). Expedition 41 Commander Max [...]
 
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    Space Industry News

  • Cassini Watches Mysterious Feature Evolve in Titan Sea

    William W.
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:05 pm
    NASA‘s Cassini spacecraft is monitoring the evolution of a mysterious feature in a large hydrocarbon sea on Saturn’s moon Titan. The feature covers an area of about 100 square miles (260 square kilometers) in Ligeia Mare, one of the largest seas on Titan. It has now been observed twice by Cassini’s radar experiment, but its appearance changed between the two apparitions. Images of the feature taken during the Cassini flybys are available at: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18430 The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark…
  • Hubble Telescope finds steamy water vapour on a planet outside our Solar System

    William W.
    24 Sep 2014 | 8:27 pm
    Astronomers using data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Kepler Space Telescope have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapour on a planet outside our Solar System. The planet, known as HAT-P-11b, is about the size of Neptune, making it the smallest exoplanet ever on which water vapour has been detected. The results will appear in the online version of the journal Nature on 24 September 2014. The discovery is a milestone on the road to eventually finding molecules in the atmospheres of smaller, rocky planets more akin to Earth. Clouds in the…
  • Stone Aerospace Tests Third Generation Of Europa Oceanic Probe Hardware: VALKYRIE

    bert
    23 Sep 2014 | 11:22 am
    On Matanuska Glacier in Alaska in June of 2014, Stone Aerospace/PSC, Inc. completed successful tests of a scaled down version of a robotic probe, the full sized edition of which will ultimately penetrate the ice on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. Named VALKYRIE (Very-deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer), the laser powered prototype set a record in melting it’s way through 30 meters of ice. VALKYRIE’s full sized incarnation will carry a pay load of autonomous deep sea explorer robots which will investigate the ocean that scientists…
  • Big Bang theory may be wrong according to new study

    William W.
    10 Sep 2014 | 11:44 am
    This new image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in northern Chile shows a vast collection of stars, the globular cluster Messier 54. This cluster looks very similar to many others but it has a secret. Messier 54 doesn’t belong to the Milky Way, but is part of a small satellite galaxy, the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy. This unusual parentage has now allowed astronomers to use the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to test whether there are also unexpectedly low levels of the element lithium in stars outside the Milky Way. The Milky Way galaxy is orbited by more than 150…
  • Hubble Finds Supernova Companion Star after Two Decades of Searching

    William W.
    9 Sep 2014 | 5:53 pm
    Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a companion star to a rare type of supernova. The discovery confirms a long-held theory that the supernova, dubbed SN 1993J, occurred inside what is called a binary system, where two interacting stars caused a cosmic explosion. “This is like a crime scene, and we finally identified the robber,” said Alex Filippenko, professor of astronomy at University of California (UC) at Berkeley. “The companion star stole a bunch of hydrogen before the primary star exploded.” SN 1993J is an example of a Type IIb…
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    Space Facts

  • Mars Missions

    Chris
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:23 am
    Since the first spacecraft was sent to Mars was launched in 1960, there have been at least 68 missions that have been launched to the Red Planet or have flown by it on their way to other solar system bodies. If you count orbiting telescopes such as Hubble Space Telescope that have looked at Mars […] The post Mars Missions appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Mars Characteristics

    Chris
    13 Oct 2014 | 3:04 pm
    Size, Mass & Gravity Mars is an Earth-like planet in many ways, but it does vary in size and gravitational pull. From spacecraft and telescope observations, planetary scientists know that it smaller and less massive than Earth. Its mass is 0.107 Earth masses and its gravity is about 62 percent less than Earth’s gravitational tug. […] The post Mars Characteristics appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Mars Features

    Chris
    28 Sep 2014 | 9:23 am
    Olympus Mons – Mars’ Volcano Mars has the largest volcano in the solar system – Olympus Mons. It measures some 600 kilometres across and rises nearly 27 kilometres above the surrounding terrain. It is a shield volcano built by the continuous action of flowing lava over millions and millions of years that began some 3 billion […] The post Mars Features appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Pictures of Comets

    Chris
    17 Sep 2014 | 1:36 pm
    The post Pictures of Comets appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Asteroid Belt Facts

    Chris
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:20 am
    What is the asteroid belt? The vast majority of asteroids in the solar system are found in a region of the solar system out beyond Mars. They form the Asteroid Belt. Others orbit in near-Earth space and a few migrate or are thrown out to the outer solar system by gravitational interactions. The four largest […] The post Asteroid Belt Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
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    Space Safety Magazine

  • Disaster Playground: The Edge of Space Fiction with Nelly Ben Hayoun

    Nikita Marwaha
    14 Oct 2014 | 12:57 am
    You might have heard of French director and designer of experiences Nelly Ben Hayoun from her past creative concoctions such as the International Space Orchestra and her musical collaboration in space with Beck and Bobby Womack. Designing immersive experiences is her forté and her latest creation, Disaster Playground, is no exception. This creative platform explores... Read more → The post Disaster Playground: The Edge of Space Fiction with Nelly Ben Hayoun from Nikita Marwaha appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • IAASS “Safety Is No Accident” Conference to Kickoff October 20

    Staff Writers
    13 Oct 2014 | 1:46 pm
    On October 20, the 7th International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS) Conference kicks off in Friedrichshafen, Germany. The three-day conference, entitled “Space Safety Is No Accident,” features speakers from around the world, come to exchange information and promote mutual understanding on space safety topics of general international concern. Today’s space is a... Read more → The post IAASS “Safety Is No Accident” Conference to Kickoff October 20 from Staff Writers appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • EIAST: The United Arab Emirates Space Program

    Hubert Foy
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    There are dozens of emerging space nations around the world seeking to capitalize on dramatic increases in space technology accessibility. We take a look at one such nation, the United Arab Emirates, exploring the opportunities and challenges they face on the road to achieving space capability. Entry of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) into the... Read more → The post EIAST: The United Arab Emirates Space Program from Hubert Foy appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • No Romance on Mars: Sex and Romance in a Mission to the Red Planet

    Tereza Pultarova
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:12 am
    Imagine the following scenario. The first batch of Martian colonists has settled on Mars. There are only ten of them currently residing on the Red Planet, both men and women, living together in a confined station only a few meters across. They see each other first thing in the morning, they share their meals, they... Read more → The post No Romance on Mars: Sex and Romance in a Mission to the Red Planet from Tereza Pultarova appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • SpaceX Wins Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award

    Staff Writers
    6 Oct 2014 | 9:05 am
    The International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety has announced that this year’s Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award will go to Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) for safety accomplishments related to its Dragon vehicle. The award will be received at the 7th IAASS Conference Awards Gala Dinner by SpaceX Director of Risk and System Safety Michael Lutomski.... Read more → The post SpaceX Wins Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award from Staff Writers appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
 
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