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  • Timely Defenders: Keeping Patriots in Shape

    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy
    Joe Katzman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:38 pm
    Patriot system The USA’s MIM-104 Phased Array Tracking Radar Intercept On Target (PATRIOT) anti-air missile system offers an advanced backbone for medium-range air defense, and short-range ballistic missile defense, to America and its allies. This article covers domestic and foreign purchase requests and contracts for Patriot systems. It also compiles information about the engineering service contracts that upgrade these systems, ensure that they continue to work, and integrate them with wider command and defense systems. The Patriot missile franchise’s future appears assured. At…
  • Firms Accused of Helping Iran Bust Sanctions | X-47B Drone Refuels, Swarms | $75 Million to Marine Species Monitoring

    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy
    Editorial Staff
    19 Apr 2015 | 7:23 pm
    North America On Friday, Raytheon announced the award of a $2 billion contract to an undisclosed international customer for the supply of new-production Patriot systems, training and support. The precise variant of the system was not revealed, however the new systems will include the “latest technology for improved threat detection, identification and engagement,” which sounds like the PAC-3 variant. Four firms and five individuals have been charged with illegally assisting Iranian procurement of defense technologies, including microelectronics. They stand accused of violating US…
  • Naval Air, Unmanned: The Long Deferred UCLASS Develops

    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy
    Joe Katzman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:50 pm
    UCAS-D/ N-UCAS concept(click to view full) The idea of UAVs with full stealth and combat capabilities has come a long way, quickly. Air forces around the world are pursuing R&D programs, but in the USA, progress is being led by the US Navy. Their interest is well-founded. A May 2007 non-partisan report discussed the lengthening reach of ship-killers. Meanwhile, the US Navy’s carrier fleet sees its strike range shrinking to 1950s distances, and prepares for a future with fewer carrier air wings than operational carriers. Could UCAV/UCAS vehicles with longer ranges, and indefinite…
  • India To Launch Saarc Satellite In 2016

    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News
    21 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
      NEW DELHI—India is working with its neighbors to establish a dedicated satellite for the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) region by next year to fulfill the requirement for satellite transponders for communication and weather forecasting. read more
  • US military option 'old habit that dies hard': Iran FM

    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense
    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Tehran (AFP) April 18, 2015 Iran's foreign minister dismissed Saturday the threat of a US military strike against Tehran's nuclear sites, describing such warnings as an "old habit that dies hard" given ongoing diplomacy. Mohammad Javad Zarif, who leads the Iranian side in talks with six world powers that aim to end the dispute over the Islamic republic's nuclear programme, said threats of conflict should be off the tab
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    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News

  • India To Launch Saarc Satellite In 2016

    21 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
      NEW DELHI—India is working with its neighbors to establish a dedicated satellite for the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) region by next year to fulfill the requirement for satellite transponders for communication and weather forecasting. read more
  • U.S. Navy Aviation Center Augments Fire Scout Maintenance Training

    21 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
    The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) North Island recently received a second trainer to augment its MQ-8C Fire Scout maintenance instruction. read more
  • AgustaWestland Developing AW119 Training Program For U.S. Military

    21 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
    LONDON—AgustaWestland says it is in discussions with Bristow Group, flight training school Doss Aviation and Rockwell Collins to offer a turnkey rotary-wing flight training system for the U.S. military and other government agencies. The offer centers on the use of AgustaWestland’s AW119 Koala single-engined light helicopter as a training platform backed up by simulators, ground instruction, fleet management and maintenance of the aircraft. read more
  • HASC Defense Authorization Markup To Begin

    21 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
    This week the House Armed Services Committee begins its markup of the fiscal 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, with subcommittees holding their markup hearings this Wednesday and Thursday, followed by the full committee’s markup on April 29. read more
  • SpeedNews Defense & Space

    21 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
    FORECAST INTERNATIONAL predicts growth in regional Latin American defense market; spending is expected to increase over 2015-2019 by a compound annual growth rate of 4.9%, with regional totals increasing from $80.5b to $102.2b. NORTHROP GRUMMANand CALTECH signed sponsored research agreement for Space Solar Power Initiative (SSPI), with Northrop providing up to $17.5m over three years to enable space-based SSP at cost parity with fossil fuel power plants. read more
 
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    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense

  • US military option 'old habit that dies hard': Iran FM

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Tehran (AFP) April 18, 2015 Iran's foreign minister dismissed Saturday the threat of a US military strike against Tehran's nuclear sites, describing such warnings as an "old habit that dies hard" given ongoing diplomacy. Mohammad Javad Zarif, who leads the Iranian side in talks with six world powers that aim to end the dispute over the Islamic republic's nuclear programme, said threats of conflict should be off the tab
  • No breakthrough in UN nuclear watchdog's Iran talks

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Vienna (AFP) April 16, 2015 Important talks between the UN atomic watchdog and Iran appeared Thursday to have failed to produce any breakthrough on a stalled probe into Tehran's alleged past efforts to develop nuclear weapons. The International Atomic Energy Agency said in a short statement Thursday a day after a meeting in Tehran that the two sides would "continue this dialogue and agreed to meet again in the near fut
  • More combat ships on way from European shipyards

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Trieste, Italy (UPI) Apr 17, 2015 Italian shipbuilder Orizzonte Sistemi Navali and DCNS of France have announced the construction of combat vessels for the navies of Italy and Egypt. Orizzonte Sistemi Navali S.p.A. said that OCCAR, the European Union agency in charge of multinational weapons procurement projects, had notified them that the Italian Navy was exercising a contract option to obtain two FREMM frigates.
  • Obama 'not surprised' at Russia missile sale to Iran

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Washington (AFP) April 17, 2015 US President Barack Obama said Friday he was not surprised that Russia lifted its ban on supplying missile systems to Iran, despite the move coming at the height of intense international talks on Tehran's nuclear program. President Vladimir Putin, whose own government is under strict economic sanctions for Russia's involvement in unrest in Crimea and Ukraine, earlier this week removed the ba
  • Mexico scrambles to find stolen radioactive material

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Mexico City (AFP) April 16, 2015 Authorities appealed for help among Mexico's population Thursday to locate stolen radioactive material, as the fourth such theft in less than two years prompted officials to mull new security measures. The interior ministry issued an alert in five southern and eastern states late Wednesday, two days after a toolbox-sized container carrying the Iridium-192 source was snatched from a truck in
 
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    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy

  • UK to Top Off Bomb Stocks After 300+ ISIS Sorties | Saudi-Financed French Arms Deliveries Hit Lebanon | Blue Force Tracker Gets First Export

    Editorial Staff
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:49 pm
    Americas On Monday the Air Force handed a $138 million modification to United Launch Services for launch vehicle production services, in support of the launch vehicle configuration of one National Reconnaissance Office Atlas V 541. The modification also included the backlog transportation of GPS IFF-10 and -11 satellites, plus commodities for the MUOS-4 mission. The company also showed-off of its Next Generation Launch System earlier this month
  • WIN-T: US Army’s Connection to the Global InfoGrid

    Joe Katzman
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:25 pm
    WIN-T concept(click to view larger) As the Army’s tactical portion of the USA’s Global Information Grid (GIG) network, Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) is designed to help deployed forces tap into that global network and its databases, collectors, and connections to national agencies. At present, this requires multiple private networks, or outright forward deployment of representatives from the agencies in question. If it can be done at all. WIN-T has absorbed the program formerly known as the Joint Network Node, and another 3 fielding increments will gradually add…
  • Firms Accused of Helping Iran Bust Sanctions | X-47B Drone Refuels, Swarms | $75 Million to Marine Species Monitoring

    Editorial Staff
    19 Apr 2015 | 7:23 pm
    North America On Friday, Raytheon announced the award of a $2 billion contract to an undisclosed international customer for the supply of new-production Patriot systems, training and support. The precise variant of the system was not revealed, however the new systems will include the “latest technology for improved threat detection, identification and engagement,” which sounds like the PAC-3 variant. Four firms and five individuals have been charged with illegally assisting Iranian procurement of defense technologies, including microelectronics. They stand accused of violating US…
  • Naval Air, Unmanned: The Long Deferred UCLASS Develops

    Joe Katzman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:50 pm
    UCAS-D/ N-UCAS concept(click to view full) The idea of UAVs with full stealth and combat capabilities has come a long way, quickly. Air forces around the world are pursuing R&D programs, but in the USA, progress is being led by the US Navy. Their interest is well-founded. A May 2007 non-partisan report discussed the lengthening reach of ship-killers. Meanwhile, the US Navy’s carrier fleet sees its strike range shrinking to 1950s distances, and prepares for a future with fewer carrier air wings than operational carriers. Could UCAV/UCAS vehicles with longer ranges, and indefinite…
  • Timely Defenders: Keeping Patriots in Shape

    Joe Katzman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:38 pm
    Patriot system The USA’s MIM-104 Phased Array Tracking Radar Intercept On Target (PATRIOT) anti-air missile system offers an advanced backbone for medium-range air defense, and short-range ballistic missile defense, to America and its allies. This article covers domestic and foreign purchase requests and contracts for Patriot systems. It also compiles information about the engineering service contracts that upgrade these systems, ensure that they continue to work, and integrate them with wider command and defense systems. The Patriot missile franchise’s future appears assured. At…
 
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    Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

  • NASA spacecraft set for death plunge into Mercury

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Miami (AFP) April 16, 2015 A NASA probe that has circled Mercury for the past four years will make a dramatic death plunge into the planet's surface in late April when it runs out of fuel. The MESSENGER spacecraft - which stands for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging - will end its run, as planned, on or around April 30, the US space agency said. Its mission was initially only supposed
  • Artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Berkeley CA (SPX) Apr 17, 2015 A potentially game-changing breakthrough in artificial photosynthesis has been achieved with the development of a system that can capture carbon dioxide emissions before they are vented into the atmosphere and then, powered by solar energy, convert that carbon dioxide into valuable chemical products, including biodegradable plastics, pharmaceutical drugs and even liquid fuels. Scientists w
  • Scientists examine rarest elements of periodic table

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Tallahassee FL (SPX) Apr 17, 2015 A little-known element called californium is making big waves in how scientists look at the periodic table. According to new research by a Florida State University professor, californium is what's known to be a transitional element, meaning it links one part of the Periodic Table of Elements to the next. b>Why's that important? br> /b> Despite the fact that you may have memorized the per
  • SpaceX Dragon cargo ship arrives at space station

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Miami (AFP) Apr 17, 2015 SpaceX's unmanned Dragon cargo ship arrived Friday at the International Space Station, carrying a load of food and supplies for the astronauts living in orbit. European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti grappled the capsule with the space station's robotic arm at 6:55 am (1055 GMT) as the space station flew over the northern Pacific to the east of Japan, NASA said. "Houst
  • GOCE helps tap into sustainable energy resources

    18 Apr 2015 | 3:29 pm
    Paris (ESA) Apr 17, 2015 Going far above and beyond its original mission objectives, results from the GOCE gravity satellite are now being used to produce maps for geothermal energy development. Geothermal energy is heat from under Earth's surface. From hot springs to magma, this energy provides a clean, sustainable resource that can be used to generate electricity, heat buildings, grow plants in greenhouses and m
 
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    Science@NASA Headline News

  • Citizen Scientists Discover Yellow "Space Balls"

    9 Apr 2015 | 9:53 am
    Citizen scientists scanning images from a NASA observatory have found "yellow balls" in space that may hold important clues to the mysteries of starbirth.
  • Total Eclipse of the Moon

    30 Mar 2015 | 2:10 pm
    On Saturday morning, April 4th, sky watchers in the USA can see a brief but beautiful total eclipse of the Moon.
  • The Mystery of Nanoflares

    19 Mar 2015 | 6:25 pm
    Tiny solar flares on the sun seem to be having an outsized effect on the temperature of the sun's atmosphere. A NASA telescope designed to study black holes may be able to crack the mystery of "nanoflares."
  • NASA to Investigate Magnetic Explosions

    10 Mar 2015 | 11:34 am
    NASA is about to launch a fleet of spacecraft to investigate the mystery of "magnetic reconnection," which is making things explode across the cosmos.
  • Dawn's Breakfast with Ceres

    5 Mar 2015 | 9:43 am
    Mark your calendar. On Friday, March 6th, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft will enter orbit around Ceres, becoming the first spacecraft from Earth to visit a dwarf planet.
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    Universe Today

  • Astronomy Cast Ep. 374: Stern-Gerlach Experiment

    Fraser Cain
    20 Apr 2015 | 11:52 am
    In the world of quantum mechanics, particles behave in discreet ways. One breakthrough experiment was the Stern-Gerlach Experiment, performed in 1922. They passed silver atoms through a magnetic field and watched how the spin of the atoms caused the particles to deflect in a very specific way. (...)Read the rest of Astronomy Cast Ep. 374: Stern-Gerlach Experiment (46 words) © Fraser for Universe Today, 2015. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
  • Close Encounter of the Asteroid Kind – 2015 HD1 Skims By Earth Tonight

    Bob King
    20 Apr 2015 | 8:43 am
    Newly found asteroid 2015 HD1 will pay a close visit to Earth overnight, zipping by at just 45,600 miles at 3:11 a.m. Tuesday morning April 21. Credit: Gianluca Masi If you wake up in the middle of the night with weird dreams about flying asteroids, I wouldn’t be surprised. Around 3 a.m. (CDT) tomorrow morning April 21, a 50-foot-wide asteroid will hurdle just 0.2 lunar distances or 45,600 miles over your bed. The Mt. Lemmon Survey, based in Tucson, Arizona, snagged the space rock  Saturday. 2015 HD1 is about as big as a full grown T-rex through not nearly as scary, since…
  • 100,000 Galaxies, and No Obvious Signs of Life

    Matt Williams
    20 Apr 2015 | 8:08 am
    False-color image of the mid-infrared emission from the Great Galaxy in Andromeda, as seen by Nasa’s WISE space telescope. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/WISE Team Beam us up, Scotty. There’s no signs of intelligent life out there. At least, no obvious signs, according to a recent survey performed by researchers at Penn State University. After reviewing data taken by the NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) space telescope of over 100,000 galaxies, there appears to be little evidence that advanced, spacefaring civilizations exist in any of them. First deployed in 2009, the…
  • Dragon Snared by Stations ‘Star Trek’ Crewmate, Delivers Science for 1 Year Mission

    Ken Kremer
    17 Apr 2015 | 8:28 pm
    “There’s coffee in that nebula”… ehm, I mean… in that #Dragon. ISS Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency in Star Trek uniform as Dragon arrives at the International Space Station on April 17, 2015. Credit: NASA KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL – Following the flawless blastoff of the SpaceX Falcon 9 booster and Dragon cargo ship on Tuesday, April 14, the resupply vessel arrived at the International Space Station today, April 17, and was successful snared by the outposts resident ‘Star Trek’ crewmate, Expedition 43 Flight Engineer…
  • Weekly Space Hangout – April 17, 2015: Amy Shira Teitel and “Breaking the Chains of Gravity”

    Fraser Cain
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Host: Fraser Cain (@fcain) Special Guest: Amy Shira Teitel (@astVintageSpace) discussing space history and her new book Breaking the Chains of Gravity Guests: Morgan Rehnberg (cosmicchatter.org / @MorganRehnberg ) (...)Read the rest of Weekly Space Hangout – April 17, 2015: Amy Shira Teitel and “Breaking the Chains of Gravity” (454 words) © Fraser for Universe Today, 2015. | Permalink | 3 comments | Post tags: ALMA, Apollo 13, ceres, Charon, Comet 67P, Comets, esa, Falcon 9, Hubble, KSC, Lego, Mars, New Horizons, Orion, philae, Pluto, Roomba, rosetta, sabre, Saturn Storm,…
 
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    The Space Review

  • A five-year checkup

    20 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    Last week marked the fifth anniversary of President Obama's speech at the Kennedy Space Center, outlining his vision for the future of NASA's space exploration efforts. Jeff Foust examines the progress NASA has made in various aspects of that vision, and the controversies that linger to this day.
  • Phobos indeed

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:59 am
    Recent studies and recommendations by advisory groups have raised interest in a mission to Phobos as a precursor to a Mars mission, perhaps in place of NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission. Louis Friedman notes that such interest in Phobos missions is not new, and may also not be that effective for long-term human Mars exploration.
  • The attraction of space social events

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:58 am
    Social events like Yuri's Night are increasingly popular, but are they an effective way to increase awareness of and interest in space? Alan Steinberg goes over the results of a survey that explored that issue.
  • Moon and Mars are physically and fiscally feasible

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:57 am
    In recent weeks, plans for human Mars missions have been criticized for both their technical and financial feasibility. John Strickland argues that these critiques don't hold up when Mars architectures are revised to take advantage of reusable launch systems.
  • Review: Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Space Dangers

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:56 am
    Space can be a dangerous place, and knowing the various risks and their odds can be vital for space exploration. Jeff Foust reviews a book that tries to do just that, but falls far short of the mark.
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    NASA Watch

  • More NASA Strategic Plan Vaporware

    Keith Cowing
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:09 am
    Goddard Implementation Plan in Response to the 2014 NASA Strategic Plan "NASA Headquarters in Washington released the latest version of its strategic plan in 2014. Strategic planning is a dynamic process that is continually taking shape within large agencies, and NASA is no exception. In response to the strategic plan, which presented a significant shift in NASA's expression of its goals and objectives, Goddard leadership recognized the need to update the center's 2004 implementation plan to show how our current work aligns with the agency's latest strategy." Committee Leaders: Space…
  • Running Out Of Rockets

    Keith Cowing
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:41 am
    Before decade is out all US military satellites may be grounded, The Hill "Today, the launch infrastructure of the United States National Security Space (NSS) -- comprised of the Department of Defense (DoD), the Services and the Intelligence Community (IC) -- is teetering on the edge of a gap in capability which, in less than five years, could mean no capacity to launch the bulk of critical national security missions for as long as ten years. We are close to retiring our existing fleet of launch vehicles without new ones to assure our access to space." Russia Threatens U.S. Space Program, CNN…
  • NASA.gov Upgrades Now Online

    Keith Cowing
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:18 am
    Welcome to the New NASA.gov "Based on extensive user feedback and testing, we've modernized NASA.gov to work across all devices and screen sizes, eliminate visual clutter, and put the focus on the continuous flow of news updates, images and videos we know you're looking for. We've simplified our image and video galleries to emphasize viewing and sharing the content, and organized that content around NASA's areas of work, like the Journey to Mars and exploration of the Solar System and Beyond. And we've made the content more "discoverable," by connecting features and images to related content…
  • Is the NASA OIG Online Hotline Secure?

    Keith Cowing
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:05 am
    Why confidential tips to the government may not be confidential after all, Washington Post "Got a hot tip about federal waste, fraud or corruption? You should think twice about using the government's own online systems for collecting such complaints. Many of them promise confidentiality but for years have sent sensitive data - including names, addresses and phone numbers of whistleblowers, as well as the details of their allegations - across the Internet in a way that could be intercepted by hackers or snoops. Or, perhaps worse still, by the agencies named in the complaints". NASA OIG…
  • View From The Barge as Falcon 1st Stage Lands

    Keith Cowing
    16 Apr 2015 | 12:39 pm
 
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    EurekAlert! - Space and Planetary Science

  • Astronomers probe inner region of young star and its planets

    19 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Arizona) Taking advantage of the unprecedented sensitivity of the Large Binocular Telescope in southeastern Arizona, an international team of astronomers has obtained the first results from the LEECH exoplanets survey. The findings reveal new insights into the architecture of HR8799, a 'scaled-up' version of our solar system 130 light-years from Earth.
  • Pulsing light may indicate supermassive black hole merger

    19 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Maryland) As two galaxies enter the final stages of merging, scientists have theorized that the galaxies' supermassive black holes will form a 'binary,' or two black holes in such close orbit they are gravitationally bound to one another. In a new study, astronomers at the University of Maryland present direct evidence of a pulsing quasar, which may substantiate the existence of black hole binaries.
  • Dartmouth-led black hole hunters tackle a cosmic conundrum

    19 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (Dartmouth College) Dartmouth astrophysicists and their colleagues have not only proven that a supermassive black hole exists in a place where it isn't supposed to be, but in doing so have opened a new door to what things were like in the early universe.
  • A cold cosmic mystery solved

    19 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa) A very large cold spot that has been a mystery for over a decade can now be explained.
  • 2015 Joint Assembly: Preliminary press conference topics; Virtual Press Room now live

    16 Apr 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (American Geophysical Union) The AGU Public Information office is planning a number of press conferences to highlight newsworthy presentations at the 2015 Joint Assembly. So far, we expect briefings on craters, thunder, water contamination, mining, and wine-making in Canada. This list may grow and is subject to change. During the Joint Assembly, journalists can find press releases and many resources online in the Virtual Press Room in the Media Center on the Joint Assembly website.
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    collectSPACE Today In Space History

  • Liberty Bell 7 lands back in Kansas

    20 Apr 2015 | 5:50 pm
    Virgil "Gus" Grissom's Mercury spacecraft, Liberty Bell 7, returned to the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center on Monday (April 20) after being shipped overseas for a German exhibit last year. Conservators plan to inspect the capsule before placing it back on display near the Cosmosphere's newly-renovated planetarium. Liberty Bell 7 is set to depart again by the end of the year for another exhibit in Indianapolis.
  • Strapping space sales

    20 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    Both Bonhams and RR Auction are holding space artifacts sales this week, and each are selling a flown strap from an Apollo astronaut's life support PLSS backpack. The straps, which Alan Bean and Edgar Mitchell wore on the moon, are among the hundreds of historic space exploration relics being offered by the two auction houses. Bonhams' sale in New York City is set for Tuesday (April 21). RR's online auction ends Thursday.
  • Made In Space sale

    16 Apr 2015 | 1:00 am
    Made In Space Inc., a company that focuses on 3D printing objects in space, announced Thursday (April 16) it is now selling its plastic feedstock for use with 3D printers on Earth. Made In Space's initial "terrestrial offerings" include "AstroABS," the same type of filament used onboard the International Space Station, and AstroABS Canister, designed for the zero-g 3D printer.
  • A statue for Sally

    15 Apr 2015 | 1:20 pm
    California's State Senate voted on Monday (April 13) to erect a statue in honor of the late Sally Ride, the first U.S. woman in space, replacing a monument to a controversial missionary in National Statuary Hall. If approved by the state's assembly and governor, the statue for Ride would succeed the one for Father Junipero Serra, a Spanish priest, installed in the Capitol in 1931.
  • Cargo and coffee

    14 Apr 2015 | 1:20 pm
    SpaceX's CRS-6 Dragon capsule launched for the International Space Station on Tuesday (April 14), carrying 4,300 pounds of cargo and research for the orbital laboratory's crew. Packed along with the live mice, artificial muscle material and asteroid-mining minisat on the Dragon was "ISSpresso," a commercially-developed espresso machine that will broaden astronaut hot beverage choices while adding to the study of fluid dynamics.
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    Astroengine.com

  • So it Could be a ‘Supervoid’ That’s Causing the Mysterious CMB ‘Cold Spot’

    Ian O'Neill
    20 Apr 2015 | 11:03 am
    Only last month I recorded a DNews video about the awesome possibilities of the “Cold Spot” that sits ominously in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy maps (anisotropies = teenie tiny temperature variations in the CMB). I still hold onto the hope that this anomalous low temperature region is being caused by a neighboring parallel universe squishing up against our own. But evidence is mounting for there actually being a vast low density region — known as a “supervoid” — between us and that Cold Spot. And that’s crappy news for my dreams of…
  • “Chewie, We’re Home.”

    Ian O'Neill
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:13 pm
    Credit: Lucasfilm/Disney I know that Star Wars lovers everywhere are currently on their nth replay of the brand new The Force Awakens movie trailer, and for good reason. BECAUSE IT IS JUST PURE AWESOMENESS. Seriously. There were tears. I have nothing else to add, except, for the first time in my adult life I can’t wait til Christmas. Keep hitting repeat. And again:
  • The Large Hadron Collider is Powering Back Up, What Next?

    Ian O'Neill
    6 Apr 2015 | 12:01 pm
    A segment of the Large Hadron Collider’s super-cooled electromagnets. Credit: CERN/LHC After a 2 year hiatus for a significant upgrade, the Large Hadron Collider is being switched back on and, early on Sunday, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator saw the first circulation of protons around its 27 kilometer ring of superconducting electromagnets. This is awesome news, especially as there was a minor electrical short last week that could have derailed this momentous occasion for weeks, or maybe months. In one of magnet segments, a metallic piece of debris from the upgrade…
  • Astroengine.com Is Back!

    Ian O'Neill
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:19 pm
    After a 14 month hiatus, it’s about time, don’t you think? You can see what else I’ve been up to on Discovery News…
  • Battlestar Galactica’s “Twelve Colonies of Kobol” Star System Found?

    Ian O'Neill
    23 Feb 2015 | 4:52 pm
    An image at radio wavelengths of a young stellar quadruplet. Credit: CfA/Nature/Pineda 825 light-years away, in the constellation of Perseus, hides one protostar and three previously unseen gas concentrations that are undergoing gravitational collapse — basically embryos of soon-to-be baby stars. Found through the analysis of data from radio telescopes by astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), this tiny cluster of baby stars occupy a small volume only 10,000 AU across — meaning that they’d all easily fit within the confines of the boundaries of…
 
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    The Daily Galaxy --Great Discoveries Channel: Sci, Space, Tech

  • "Supermassive Black Hole Exists Where It Shouldn't Be" --Inside a Blob Galaxy

    dailygalaxy.com
    20 Apr 2015 | 3:19 pm
    Henize 2-10 is a small irregular galaxy that is not too far away in astronomical terms -- 30 million light-years. "This is a dwarf starburst galaxy -- a small galaxy with regions of very rapid star formation -- about 10 percent of the size of our own Milky Way," says co-author Ryan Hickox, an assistant professor in Dartmouth's Department of Physics and Astronomy. "If you look at it, it's a blob, but it surprisingly harbors a central black hole." Hickox says there may be similar small galaxies in the known universe, but this is one of the only ones close enough to allow detailed study. Lead…
  • "Pulsing Lights of the Universe" --May Signal Gravitational Waves from Merging Black Holes

    dailygalaxy.com
    20 Apr 2015 | 8:34 am
    As two galaxies enter the final stages of merging, scientists have theorized that the galaxies' supermassive black holes will form a "binary," or two black holes in such close orbit they are gravitationally bound to one another. In a new study, astronomers at the University of Maryland present direct evidence of a pulsing quasar, which may substantiate the existence of black hole binaries. "We believe we have observed two supermassive black holes in closer proximity than ever before," said Suvi Gezari, assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland and a co-author of the…
  • Mystery of Largest Structure Ever Identified in the Universe --The Eridanus Supervoid and Cold Spot

    dailygalaxy.com
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:30 am
    Getting through a supervoid can take millions of years, even at the speed of light, so this measurable effect, known as the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, might provide the first explanation one of the most significant anomalies found to date in the CMB, first by a NASA satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), and more recently, by Planck, a satellite launched by the European Space Agency. In 2004, astronomers examining a map of the radiation leftover from the Big Bang (the cosmic microwave background, or CMB) discovered the Cold Spot, a larger-than-expected…
  • "The Unexplored Planet" --NASA Spacecraft Begins 1st stage of Epic Pluto Probe

    dailygalaxy.com
    19 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    “NASA first mission to distant Pluto will also be humankind’s first close up view of this cold, unexplored world in our solar system,” said Jim Green, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division at the agency’s Headquarters in Washington. “The New Horizons team worked very hard to prepare for this first phase, and they did it flawlessly.” NASA's New Horizons spacecraft recently began its long-awaited, historic encounter with Pluto. The spacecraft is entering the first of several approach phases that culminate July 14 with the first close-up flyby of the dwarf planet, 4.67…
  • Search for "Messengers from the Universe" --The Antarctica Ice-Cube Observatory

    dailygalaxy.com
    18 Apr 2015 | 7:43 am
    Neutrinos are a type of particle that pass through just about everything in their path from even the most distant regions of the universe. The Earth is constantly bombarded by billions of neutrinos, which zip right through the entire globe, houses, animals, people - everything. Only very rarely do they react with matter, but the giant IceCube experiment at the South Pole can detect when there is a collision between neutrinos and atoms in the ice using a network of detectors. New research results from the Niels Bohr Institute among others have measured the neutrinos at the South Pole and have…
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    Icarus Interstellar » Icarus Interstellar | A nonprofit foundation dedicated to achieving interstellar flight by 2100.

  • Support Icarus by Shopping at Amazon? Sure why not!

    Andreas Tziolas
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:51 pm
      Just click on the image, shop at Amazon as you normally would and 0.5% will go to Icarus Interstellar in support of Interstellar Flight. All funds are spent in support of the program, our students and our mission to promote deep space exploration, education and interstellar achievements for all humankind. Thank you!
  • Icarus Interstellar University of Miami Chapter

    admin
    14 Apr 2015 | 10:17 pm
      In the ever-evolving world of science, energetic innovation is key to providing students with the inspiration necessary to dive into the modern STEM workforce. We joined Icarus Interstellar as the official University of Miami student chapter with that in mind, and with the goal of looking into not only what can be done today, but forward into what will be possible tomorrow. After becoming accepted as an official chapter through our initial research proposal of a novel spacecraft, which we named a “µProbe”, we met with Icarus Interstellar President Dr. Andreas Tziolas to discuss…
  • FTL Research, Philosophy, and Starship Congress 2015

    Buck Field
    8 Apr 2015 | 7:44 pm
    Stephen Hawking, speaking at Google’s Zeitgeist Conference in the UK said: “Philosophers have not kept up with modern developments in science. Particularly physics.” There’s a lot of criticism like that from the top of the physics community, claims that philosophy doesn’t collect experimental data, that it’s useless to the working physicist, and so on.” While people tend to hang on Hawking’s every word, I recall a particular lecture in which he explained with absolute certainty that the cosmological constant was somewhere between 0 and 1. A philosopher who…
  • Introducing Project Solaris – Towards the Conception of a Distributed Solar Energy Harvester

    Nembo Buldrini
    20 Feb 2015 | 2:34 am
    [logo for Project Solaris by Nembo Buldrini] Energy from the Sun When it comes to space exploration, energy supplying is surely one of the most limiting issues. Our Sun is the largest energy source in our solar system and probably will stay unrivaled for the next several centuries. The amount of power it radiates is daunting, and being able to manage even a fraction of it would enable a huge step forward in space exploration and exploitation. [Image Credit: Nembo Buldrini]   All we Need is a Large Mirror… Other forms of energy production methods are expected to be developed over the…
  • A plumber’s guide to Starships – Part VI – Steam Pipes and Heat pipes

    Michel Lamontagne
    15 Feb 2015 | 10:50 am
    There’s a lot of energy in the vaporization phase change. In the form of water changing from a liquid into a gas, it has been at the center of most of the world’s energy production systems for the last century.  Recently, direct energy conversion has started replacing it with wind and photoelectric power, and hydro-power always did fine without it(1).  Although phase change is unlikely to ever power starships, it still has a future in solar collectors and nuclear reactors, most designs for fusion reactors… and it may very well be the best way to cool a starship.   Gaseous…
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    Pillow Astronaut

  • Artoo in Love

    PillowNaut
    15 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    So today I get to hit you with the best three minutes and thirty seconds you have ever seen on YouTube. And if you're a fan of Star Wars, you will of course consider this an R2-D2 "spinoff" film -- hopefully the first of many??The aerial shots and special effects alone are worth the cinematic interest, the sound effects are a crack-up, and to anyone who has grown up watching Star Wars (and that's all of us), it's stunning the degree to which this little droid can still draw adoration from our hearts. "I don't know. Fly casual."Who hasn't fallen head-over-wheels in love this way, fallen into…
  • Countdown to Yuri's Night!

    PillowNaut
    6 Apr 2015 | 8:30 am
     On April 12, 1961, Yuri Gagarin became the first human being to enter space. Secured in a small capsule named Vostok 1, he launched from Leninsk, Kazakhstan (now renamed "Baikonur"), the first and still-largest space launch facility in the world. The 27-year-old cosmonaut made a historic 106-minute (not 108!) orbital flight around planet Earth.Юрий Гагарин 1934 - 1968In 1962, the Soviet Union established , or "Cosmonautics Day,” to commemorate this amazing achievement.In 2001, Loretta Hidalgo, George T. Whitesides and Trish Garner founded "Yuri’s Night," with the support…
  • Vacation!

    PillowNaut
    19 Feb 2015 | 5:35 pm
    That's not a typo! Vacation!I'm sorry I have not been writing as often as usual -- but it's also gratifying to have so many new projects, even if they divide my attention!I'm going on another blog hiatus, but for happier reasons. For the first time in 6 years, I am taking a GENUINE vacation, where there is no "work" involved before or after fun days off.For three weeks, I'll be traveling through the Dutch Antilles and Latin America, and I'm not taking my laptop. I guess by the end of week 1, I'll know if "not being connected to the internet" is a relief, or bringing on serious…
  • Weightless 3D Printing: The Next Giant Leap

    PillowNaut
    2 Feb 2015 | 6:12 am
    The race to Mars quietly enjoyed two giant leaps toward reality in recent months. A journey to the red planet poses many challenges: propulsion, radiation shielding, predicting what a ship and crew would need to make the journey, and of course, human health over the 500+ theoretical mission days.Addressing the health piece, NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly and RFSA Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko will spend an entire year in orbit, a long-duration experiment designed to study physiological changes in weightlessness, as well as psychological reactions to isolation.The other piece? A small company called…
  • They Were Flying For Me

    PillowNaut
    28 Jan 2015 | 9:10 am
    The end of January and beginning of February holds an unusual amount of losses for our space program:January 27, 1967… Apollo 1 lostJanuary 28, 1986… Challenger STS-51L lostFebruary 1, 2003… Columbia STS-107 lost I have to be careful on this day, because many news outlets re-run footage ofChallenger in particular, and I for one simply never wish to view it again. Instead, from time to time, I chose to visit the Challenger Memorial in Houston, while it was still there. I have also visited the Apollo 1 Memorial at Cape Canaveral, and the Columbia Memorial in Arlington.While there are many…
 
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    AmericaSpace

  • Numerous Research Investigations and Dragon Arrival Highlight Busy Week on Space Station

    Sherry Valare
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:11 pm
    Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, of the European Space Agency (ESA), poses with the SpaceX CRS-6 Dragon in her Starfleet outfit after successfully capturing the cargo and supply-filled spacecraft. Photo Credit: NASA/ESA The six Expedition 43 crew members currently living and working on the International Space Station (ISS) kept a busy schedule last week. [...]
  • Don Pettit, Fourth Most Experienced US Astronaut, Turns 60 Today

    Ben Evans
    20 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    Don Pettit holds a still camera as he looks through the nadir window in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). The islands of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura of the Canary Island chain in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Morocco are visible. Photo Credit: NASA Astronaut Don Pettit, a veteran of [...]
  • All Hail the Deputy Chief: Veteran Spacewalker Chris Cassidy Assumes Senior Astronaut Office Role

    Ben Evans
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Chris Cassidy conducts Earth observations and photography in the space station’s multi-windowed cupola during his six-month ISS expedition in 2013. Photo Credit: NASA Less than a year since his elevation to Chief of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and Robotics within the Astronaut Office (Code CB) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas—and only [...]
  • ‘We Show You on the Mains': 45 Years Since the Unlucky Voyage of Apollo 13 (Part 4)

    Ben Evans
    19 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Seen later in the mission, the damage to an entire side panel of Apollo 13’s service module is apparent. It remains miraculous that the crew survived. Photo Credit: NASA By the middle of April 1970, Project Apollo—America’s effort to land a man on the lunar surface—had reached one of its most decisive points of [...]
  • Orbiting Rainbows: Using ‘Glitter Clouds’ to Search For and Image Exoplanets

    Paul Scott Anderson
    18 Apr 2015 | 4:59 pm
    Click here to view the embedded video.The search for exoplanets may one day get a lot more glittery. It sounds a bit like science fiction, but a new NASA proposal called Orbiting Rainbows would use glitter-like materials to help image some of those far-away worlds, which could enable high-resolution imaging at a fraction of the cost. [...]
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    Space Industry News

  • Accelerating universe? Not so fast

    William W.
    12 Apr 2015 | 10:25 am
    Certain types of supernovae, or exploding stars, are more diverse than previously thought, a University of Arizona-led team of astronomers has discovered. The results, reported in two papers published in the Astrophysical Journal, have implications for big cosmological questions, such as how fast the universe has been expanding since the Big Bang. Most importantly, the findings hint at the possibility that the acceleration of the expansion of the universe might not be quite as fast as textbooks say. The team, led by UA astronomer Peter A. Milne, discovered that type Ia supernovae, which have…
  • Complex Organic Molecules Discovered in Infant Star System

    William W.
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:56 am
    Building blocks of the chemistry of life are universal For the first time, astronomers have detected the presence of complex organic molecules, the building blocks of life, in a protoplanetary disc surrounding a young star. The discovery, made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), reaffirms that the conditions that spawned the Earth and Sun are not unique in the Universe. The results are published in the 9 April 2015 issue of the journal Nature. The new ALMA observations reveal that the protoplanetary disc surrounding the young star MWC 480 [1] contains large amounts…
  • Sun experiences seasonal changes, new research finds

    William W.
    7 Apr 2015 | 10:05 am
    Quasi-annual variations may hold clues to space weather NATIONAL CENTER FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH/UNIVERSITY CORPORATION FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH BOULDER -The Sun undergoes a type of seasonal variability with its activity waxing and waning over the course of nearly two years, according to a new study by a team of researchers led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). This behavior affects the peaks and valleys in the approximately 11-year solar cycle, sometimes amplifying and sometimes weakening the solar storms that can buffet Earth’s atmosphere. The quasi-annual…
  • NASA Awards Information Technology Contracts to 118 Small, Disadvantaged Businesses

    NASA Press Release
    4 Apr 2015 | 6:52 am
    NASA has awarded 118 contracts to small, disadvantaged businesses under Solutions for Enterprise-Wide Procurement (SEWP V), a multi-award Government-Wide Acquisition Contract (GWAC) vehicle focused on information technology products and product-based services. Of these SEWP V contracts, 14 were awarded to businesses operating in historically underutilized business zones, 25 contracts were awarded to business owned by service-disabled veterans, and 79 contracts were awarded to other small businesses for server support devices and/or multi-functional devices. The contracts are firm-fixed-price,…
  • Naval Research Labs Researchers Pattern Magnetic Graphene

    William W.
    16 Mar 2015 | 1:53 pm
    Graphene, an atomically thin sheet of carbon, has been intensively studied for the last decade to reveal exceptional mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Recently, researchers have started to explore an even more surprising property—magnetism. Theories and experiments have suggested that either defects in graphene or chemical groups bound to graphene can cause it to exhibit magnetism; however, to date there was no way to create large-area magnetic graphene which could be easily patterned. Now, scientists from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have found a simple and robust…
 
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    Space Facts

  • Galaxy Types

    Chris
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:56 am
    The most widely used classification scheme for galaxies is based on one devised by Edwin P. Hubble and further refined by astronomer Gerard de Vaucouleurs. It uses the three main types, and then further breaks them down by specific characteristics (openness of spirals, size and extent of bars, size of galactic bulges). In this age […] The post Galaxy Types appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Black Hole Facts

    Chris
    6 Apr 2015 | 4:33 am
    Black holes are among the strangest things in the universe. They are massive objects – collections of mass – with gravity so strong that nothing can escape, not even light. The most common types of black holes are the stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. Stellar-mass black holes are created when massive stars explode, leaving behind […] The post Black Hole Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • New Horizons Mission & Spacecraft Facts

    Chris
    25 Mar 2015 | 1:40 pm
    NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is on a mission to collect data and images of the dwarf planet Pluto, its surrounding moons and other objects in the Kuiper Belt. An earlier mission, named the Pluto Kuiper Express, was cancelled by NASA in 2000 due to funding issues, yet six years later the New Horizons mission was launched. Mission […] The post New Horizons Mission & Spacecraft Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Whirlpool Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    16 Mar 2015 | 3:13 pm
    The Whirlpool Galaxy is a familiar one to stargazers and among the many close galaxy neighbors to our own Milky Way. Because of its shape, it was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral by astronomers. Today, it interests astronomers due to its spiral structure and the interaction it appears to be having […] The post Whirlpool Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Dawn Mission & Spacecraft Facts

    Chris
    18 Feb 2015 | 12:22 pm
    NASA’s Dawn spacecraft is on a mission to explore the two largest objects in the asteroid belt the asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, gathering data relating to their composition, internal structure, density and shape. The main objectives of the mission are to gather data to aid further understanding of the role that size and water […] The post Dawn Mission & Spacecraft Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
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    Space Safety Magazine

  • Press Clips Week 17-2015

    Staff Writers
    20 Apr 2015 | 4:00 am
    AGI’S Commercial Space Operations Center Supports Tracking of Boeing’s First All-Electrical Satellites The Commercial Space Operations Center (ComSpOC) of AGI, has been awarded its first Launch and Early Operations Phase (LEOP) subscription contract with The Boeing Company to deliver space situational awareness (SSA) data for its first all-electric propulsion 702SP satellites. The ComSpOC provides LEOP support... Read more → The post Press Clips Week 17-2015 from Staff Writers appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Remembering the Space Shuttle Challenger Crew

    Michelle La Vone
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    On January 28, 1986, six American astronauts and a schoolteacher lost their lives after the explosion of Space Shuttle Challenger (mission STS-51-L) and the subsequent high-impact crash of its orbiter with the Atlantic Ocean. The disaster was both man- and nature-borne, with a sequence of poor engineering and management decisions colliding head-on with abnormally cold... Read more → The post Remembering the Space Shuttle Challenger Crew from Michelle La Vone appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Sierra Nevada Corporation Unveils Cargo Version of Dream Chaser

    Matteo Emanuelli
    15 Apr 2015 | 7:12 am
    On March 25, Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) unveiled at the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) Spring Meeting the new variant of the Dream Chaser spacecraft, the Dream Chaser Cargo System. The new solution has been developed to bid for in the new NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services (CRS2) contract. A crewed version of the Dream Chaser has... Read more → The post Sierra Nevada Corporation Unveils Cargo Version of Dream Chaser from Matteo Emanuelli appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Press Clips – Week 16-2015

    Stéphane Heinrich
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:11 am
    SpaceX to Try Daring Rocket Landing Again Monday SpaceX aims to bring the first stage of its Falcon 9 rocket back to Earth for a soft touchdown on an unmanned “spaceport drone ship” in the Atlantic Ocean after the booster sends Dragon on its way toward the orbiting lab Monday (April 13). Full Industry Control of Ariane 6 Non-negotiable, Exec... Read more → The post Press Clips – Week 16-2015 from Stéphane Heinrich appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Decoding the Mystery of Destructive Reentry

    Siddharth Raval
    13 Apr 2015 | 1:13 am
    As the number of space debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) increases year by year, it is becoming a major environmental concern for safe access to space. Presently the density of debris in LEO has reached to a critical level that could possibly lead to unrestrained growth. The rate at which new debris are created... Read more → The post Decoding the Mystery of Destructive Reentry from Siddharth Raval appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
 
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