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  • SpeedNews Defense & Space

    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News
    1 Apr 2015 | 4:45 pm
    DATA DEVICE CORPORATION (DDC), NY, acquired EMRISE ELECTRONICS (power management products) for $22m. STANDARDAERO acquired DUTCHAERO SERVICESfrom GE/Avio to establish a European Support Center at Woensdrecht Air Base in The Netherlands for F100 and F135 engines. DAS will be branded as STANDARDAERO DEFENSE SERVICES EUROPE read more
  • U.S. Air Force tests Minuteman III missiles

    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense
    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Vandenberg Afb, Calif. (UPI) Mar 30, 2015 Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles have been launched by the U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command to verify the accuracy and reliability of the weapon system. Both Minuteman IIIs were unarmed, and their test re-entry vehicles impacted within 40 minutes of each other in a pre-established test area last week near the island of Guam. "An operational test launch requires hard work,
  • Tiny Bird Breaks Travel Records

    Discovery News
    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    A songbird described as a lean, mean flying machine has just been tracked flying non-stop over the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Army Copter Buyers Seek to Learn from Ground Vehicle Designers | Report: KAI Winning KF-X Contract

    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy
    Editorial Staff
    30 Mar 2015 | 8:12 pm
    Americas Raytheon was awarded a $700 million contract today in support of Norad’s Integrated Tactical Warning/Attack Assessment system, while United Launch Services was awarded a $90.3 million contract for space launch vehicles, including the services in support of Air Force and NRO systems. Army helicopter chiefs are reportedly seeking to collaborate with ground vehicle manufacturers in order to develop new technologies to fight in harsh weather conditions. This will principally take the form of the DVE-M, or Degraded Visual Environment-Mitigation, program, which seeks to find ways of…
  • Follow the International Space Station Launch

    NYT > Space & Cosmos
    THE NEW YORK TIMES
    27 Mar 2015 | 10:40 am
    Scott Kelly is the first American astronaut to head into space for a year. He arrived at the International Space Station Friday with two Russians. See how the launch went with bits of trivia and photos.
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    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News

  • SpeedNews Defense & Space

    1 Apr 2015 | 4:45 pm
    DATA DEVICE CORPORATION (DDC), NY, acquired EMRISE ELECTRONICS (power management products) for $22m. STANDARDAERO acquired DUTCHAERO SERVICESfrom GE/Avio to establish a European Support Center at Woensdrecht Air Base in The Netherlands for F100 and F135 engines. DAS will be branded as STANDARDAERO DEFENSE SERVICES EUROPE read more
  • Kurt Rossner To Head A400M Program

    1 Apr 2015 | 4:45 pm
    Airbus Defense & Space has chosen Kurt Rossner to lead the A400M airlifter program following the reorganization of the management team announced at the end of January. German-born Rossner, currently head of the company’s light and medium derivatives division, which builds the C235 and C295 turboprop transports, will take over as head of the A400M program on April 1, replacing Rafael Tentor, who will take Rossner’s current role. read more
  • Leisure Fares: Week Of March 23 vs. Previous Week And Year-Ago Week

    1 Apr 2015 | 2:38 pm
    /site-files/aviationweek.com/files/uploads/2015/03/avd_04_01_2015_cht1.pdf
  • Business Fares: Week Of March 23 vs. Previous Week And Year-Ago Week

    1 Apr 2015 | 2:38 pm
    /site-files/aviationweek.com/files/uploads/2015/03/avd_04_01_2015_cht2.pdf
  • Comair Approved To Provide Air Service To St. Helena

    1 Apr 2015 | 2:38 pm
    The St. Helena government says it has concluded negotiations for South African airline Comair to provide air service to the remote British island territory. The service will operate as a British Airways flight as part of its license agreement with the U.K. flag carrier, flying once a week to the South Atlantic island using a Boeing 737-800 from Johannesburg’s O.R. Tambo International Airport to the new St. Helena airport, set to open early next year (Aviation Daily, March 17). More flights will be considered if demand warrants. read more
 
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    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense

  • U.S. Air Force tests Minuteman III missiles

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Vandenberg Afb, Calif. (UPI) Mar 30, 2015 Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles have been launched by the U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command to verify the accuracy and reliability of the weapon system. Both Minuteman IIIs were unarmed, and their test re-entry vehicles impacted within 40 minutes of each other in a pre-established test area last week near the island of Guam. "An operational test launch requires hard work,
  • 'Yes or no' time as Iran nuclear talks near deadline

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Lausanne (AFP) March 30, 2015 Global powers raced against the clock Monday on the eve of a deadline to nail down the final pieces of a framework deal aimed at putting any Iranian nuclear bomb out of reach. Adding to the drama, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov left the crunch talks with Iran in Switzerland after a series of meetings, Russian media reported. He will only return if there is a "realistic" chance o
  • Australia eyes new air search radar

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Canberra, Australia (UPI) Mar 30, 2015 A proposal to replace air search radar aboard Royal Australian Navy frigates has received First Pass approval from the government. The approval for project SEA 1448 Phase 4B – ANZAC Air Search Radar Replacement, enables the Department of Defense to keep working with Australia's CEA Technologies on development of a new air search radar that incorporates an Identification-Friend-or-Foe
  • China suspected as software site GitHub hit by attack

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Washington (AFP) March 30, 2015 The software collaboration website GitHub said Monday it was fighting off a cyber attack since late last week, and security analysts said the effort appeared to originate in China. A US website described as "the world's largest code host," GitHub said it first noticed the so-called distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack Thursday, with intermittent disruptions over the past few days.
  • France, Britain jointly contract for naval drones

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Paris (UPI) Mar 30, 2015 Surface and underwater naval drones for combating mines are to be developed by a European industrial consortium by 2019. France's Ministry of Defense said the joint Maritime Mine Counter Measures contract from France and Britain was issued to Thales, teamed with BAE Systems, and the ESA Group, through the European Union's Organization for Joint Armament Cooperation. "The MMCM pro
 
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    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy

  • Army Copter Buyers Seek to Learn from Ground Vehicle Designers | Report: KAI Winning KF-X Contract

    Editorial Staff
    30 Mar 2015 | 8:12 pm
    Americas Raytheon was awarded a $700 million contract today in support of Norad’s Integrated Tactical Warning/Attack Assessment system, while United Launch Services was awarded a $90.3 million contract for space launch vehicles, including the services in support of Air Force and NRO systems. Army helicopter chiefs are reportedly seeking to collaborate with ground vehicle manufacturers in order to develop new technologies to fight in harsh weather conditions. This will principally take the form of the DVE-M, or Degraded Visual Environment-Mitigation, program, which seeks to find ways of…
  • KF-X Fighter: Korea’s Future Homegrown Jet

    Joe Katzman
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:06 pm
    KODEF ’11 slide(click to view full) South Korea has been thinking seriously about designing its own fighter jet since 2008. The ROK defense sector has made impressive progress, and has become a notable exporter of aerospace, land, and naval equipment. The idea of a plane that helps advance their aerospace industry, while making it easy to add new Korean-designed weapons, is very appealing. On the flip side, a new jet fighter is a massive endeavor at the best of times, and wildly unrealistic technical expectations didn’t help the project. KF-X has progressed in fits and starts, and…
  • GD Gives Up on T-X Trainer | Lockheed Cleans Up on Targeting Pods | Thales & BAE Partner for Counter Mine Unmanned Vessels

    Editorial Staff
    29 Mar 2015 | 8:07 pm
    Americas General Dynamics has removed itself as prime contractor for the T-100 trainer, a contender for the T-X requirement to provide next-generation trainer jets to replace the T-38. The Air Force released the final set of requirements for the T-X only a matter of days ago and with GD now withdrawing, the ability of manufacturer Alenia Aermacchi to compete without a US prime is uncertain, especially given the high level of competition for the lucrative program. Lockheed Martin was awarded a $485 million IDIQ contract Friday for advanced targeting pods, a portion of which are earmarked for…
  • ATP-SE: LITENING Targeting Pods Now Feature ‘Gen-5′

    Joe Katzman
    29 Mar 2015 | 5:45 pm
    Sniper on F-16(click to view full) At the end of September 2010, the USAF dropped something of a bombshell. Under their $2.3 billion Advanced Targeting Pod – Sensor Enhancement (ATP-SE) contract, the service that had begun standardizing on one future surveillance and targeting pod type decided to change course, and split its buys. This decision is a huge breakthrough for Northrop Grumman, whose LITENING pod had lost the USAF’s initial 2001 Advanced Targeting Pod competition. As a result of that competition, the USAF’s buys had shifted from LITENING to Sniper pods, and…
  • Ford-Class Carriers Kick Fixes Down Road to Stay in ‘Budget’ | Turkey’s Air Defense Competition Gets Stranger | China Playing with VTOL

    Editorial Staff
    26 Mar 2015 | 7:20 pm
    Americas The US Navy’s Super Hornets and Growlers can’t carry additional 480-gallon fuel tanks when launched from the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) because of the stress created by the ship’s catapult, manufactured by General Atomics. The GAO has previously stated that other required improvements to the ship are being deferred by the Navy to 2016 in an effort to keep the project within the $12.9 billion cost cap. The Navy’s Super Hornets will receive six a…
 
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    Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

  • New Horizons Sampling 'Space Weather' on Approach to Pluto

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Boulder CO (SPX) Mar 31, 2015 As NASA's New Horizons spacecraft approaches the Pluto system, its space plasma (also called charged particle) instruments - SWAP and PEPSSI - have already been taking measurements and assessing the space weather environment in the Kuiper Belt near Pluto. "Results from those measurements are being radioed to the ground and our team is already learning new things about the distant environme
  • Falcon 9 Evolves

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Bethesda, MD (SPX) Mar 31, 2015 SpaceX developed the two-stage Falcon 9, a family of launch vehicles that consists of the Falcon 9 v1.0, Falcon 9 v1.1, and the partially-reusable Falcon 9-R. Both stages of each vehicle employ liquid oxygen (LOX) and RP-1 propellants. The Falcon 9 v1.1 can lift payloads of up to 13,150 kg to low Earth orbit (LEO), and 4,850 kg to geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The initial versi
  • MESSENGER Completes 4,000th Orbit of Mercury

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Laurel MD (SPX) Mar 31, 2015 On March 25, the MESSENGER spacecraft completed its 4,000th orbit of Mercury, and the lowest point in its orbit continues to move closer to the planet than ever before. The orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission, which was originally designed to collect data for one Earth year, just completed its fourth year of operation around Mercury. The mission has received a final extension to allow scienti
  • NSF-Funded Physics Frontiers Center Expands Hunt for Gravitational Waves

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Pasadena CA (SPX) Mar 31, 2015 The search for gravitational waves-elusive ripples in the fabric of space-time predicted to arise from extremely energetic and large-scale cosmic events such as the collisions of neutron stars and black holes-has expanded, thanks to a $14.5-million, five-year award from the National Science Foundation for the creation and operation of a multi-institution Physics Frontiers Center (PFC) called the
  • Earthlike 'Star Wars' Tatooines may be common

    30 Mar 2015 | 7:35 am
    Salt Lake City UT (SPX) Mar 31, 2015 Luke Skywalker's home in "Star Wars" is the desert planet Tatooine, with twin sunsets because it orbits two stars. So far, only uninhabitable gas-giant planets have been identified circling such binary stars, and many researchers believe rocky planets cannot form there. Now, mathematical simulations show that Earthlike, solid planets such as Tatooine likely exist and may be widespread. "Ta
 
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    Science@NASA Headline News

  • Total Eclipse of the Moon

    30 Mar 2015 | 2:10 pm
    On Saturday morning, April 4th, sky watchers in the USA can see a brief but beautiful total eclipse of the Moon.
  • The Mystery of Nanoflares

    19 Mar 2015 | 6:25 pm
    Tiny solar flares on the sun seem to be having an outsized effect on the temperature of the sun's atmosphere. A NASA telescope designed to study black holes may be able to crack the mystery of "nanoflares."
  • NASA to Investigate Magnetic Explosions

    10 Mar 2015 | 11:34 am
    NASA is about to launch a fleet of spacecraft to investigate the mystery of "magnetic reconnection," which is making things explode across the cosmos.
  • Dawn's Breakfast with Ceres

    5 Mar 2015 | 9:43 am
    Mark your calendar. On Friday, March 6th, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft will enter orbit around Ceres, becoming the first spacecraft from Earth to visit a dwarf planet.
  • Subtracting Gravity from Alzheimer's

    4 Mar 2015 | 8:25 am
    The key to unraveling the mysterious cause of Alzheimer’s disease may not lie in the recesses of the human brain, but rather in the weightless expanse of space.
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    Universe Today

  • Stunning Photo of Volcanic Lightning at Volcán de Colima in Mexico

    Nancy Atkinson
    31 Mar 2015 | 12:47 pm
    The Colima Volcano (Volcán de Colima) pictured on March 29, 2015 with lightning arcing through the ash plume. Credit and copyright: César Cantú. The Colima volcano in Mexico is active again, and has been spewing out large plumes of ash nearly 3 kilometers into the air. Astrophotographer César Cantú captured this spectacular picture of lightning slicing through the cloud of ash. How can lightning strike in an ash cloud? Through friction, particles of the ash can charge each other by rubbing against each other during the eruption. When the energy is discharged, it can create lightning…
  • Seeking Ceres: Following the Brave New World Through 2015

    David Dickinson
    31 Mar 2015 | 10:25 am
    A misshapen crescent Ceres as seen from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech/UCLA/DLR/IDA A little world is making big headlines in 2015. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around 1 Ceres on March 6th, 2015, gaving us the first stunning images of the ~900 kilometre diameter world. But whether you refer to Ceres as a dwarf planet, minor planet, or the king of the asteroid belt, this corner of the solar system’s terra incognita is finally open for exploration. It has been a long time coming, as Ceres has appeared as little more than a wandering, star-like dot in…
  • Carnival of Space #398-399

    Susie Murph
    31 Mar 2015 | 8:53 am
    Carnival of Space. Image by Jason Major. This week’s Carnival of Space is hosted by Brian Wang at his Next Big Future blog. Click here to read Carnival of Space #399 (...)Read the rest of Carnival of Space #398-399 (89 words) © susie for Universe Today, 2015. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: Carnival of Space Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh
  • Don’t Blink! April 4th Lunar Eclipse Shortest of the Century

    Bob King
    31 Mar 2015 | 7:14 am
    As the Moon slips into Earth’s shadow it will undergo a total eclipse early Saturday morning April 4.  The partial phases will span some 3 1/2 hours, but totality lasts less than five minutes. Credit: Keith Burns / NASA Get ready for one awesome total lunar eclipse early Saturday morning April 4th. For the third time in less than a year, the Moon dips into Earth’s shadow, its dazzling white globe turning sunset red right before your eyes.  All eclipses are not-to-miss events, but Saturday’s totality will be the shortest in a century. Brief but beautiful – just…
  • Will Space Play in the 2016 US Election?

    Morgan Rehnberg
    30 Mar 2015 | 1:45 pm
    It might be only March of 2015, but the race (slog?) is on to be the next president of the United States. Only 589 days to go! It’s a race that some believe will cost the nation upwards of five billion dollars; that’s about 7.5 Mars missions for those of you out there counting. The campaign, though, is more than just a vehicle for terrible campaign ads and embarrassing debate gaffes; it’s also one of the few opportunities for the country to have a discussion about its  national priorities in the coming years. So, what are the chances that the exploration of space will be in…
 
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    Space

  • Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

    Eric Westervelt
    28 Mar 2015 | 2:22 pm
    Astronaut Scott Kelly has arrived at the International Space Station on a yearlong mission. He and Mark Kelly, his twin and fellow NASA astronaut, will take part in experiments comparing their health.» E-Mail This
  • A Day's A Day The World Around — But Shorter On Saturn

    Geoff Brumfiel
    28 Mar 2015 | 4:38 am
    Researchers have finally determined the length of a day on the ringed planet (gas shrouds any landmarks, so it was tough). Precision matters: A faster spin influences the speed of surface winds.» E-Mail This
  • Want To Do A Little Astrophysics? This App Detects Cosmic Rays

    Joe Palca
    27 Mar 2015 | 11:30 am
    Two physicists keen to detect a a very rare, high energy particle think you and I can help. The researchers are working on an app that would allow any smartphone to detect rare particles from space.» E-Mail This
  • NASA To Study A Twin In Space And His Brother On Earth

    Nell Greenfieldboyce
    27 Mar 2015 | 1:43 am
    During astronaut Scott Kelly's year in space, scientists will compare his physiology with that of his twin brother, Mark, to study the effect of prolonged space flight on the human body.» E-Mail This
  • NASA Rover Opportunity Wins Mars Marathon

    25 Mar 2015 | 4:35 am
    It only took the vehicle 11 years and 2 months. That's the furthest any off-earth vehicle has traveled — beating out the Soviet Union's moon rover.» E-Mail This
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    The Space Review

  • For commercial cargo, ideas old and new

    23 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    At least five companies have said they have submitted proposals to NASA for commercial cargo contracts. Jeff Foust describes the proposals made by two companies seeking to enter this market, one repurposing a crewed vehicle concept and the other offering a novel approach that could be used beyond Earth orbit as well.
  • Discovery lives

    23 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    NASA received last month more than two dozen proposals for the next round of its Discovery program of low-cost planetary science missions. Jason Callahan examines what we know about the various mission concepts submitted and the implications for NASA's overall planetary science program.
  • NASA rearms in its battle with mission skeptics

    23 Mar 2015 | 3:59 am
    Last week NASA announced that it had selected an option for its Asteroid Redirect Mission that involves collecting a boulder from an asteroid and returning it to cislunar space. Jeff Foust reports on the reasons why NASA selected that option and why skeptics of ARM in general appear unlikely to be won over.
  • The return of the satellite constellations

    23 Mar 2015 | 3:59 am
    In the 1990s, a number of ventures tried to develop constellations of dozens or hundreds of communications satellites; they either ended up in bankruptcy reorganization or failed outright. Yet, Jeff Foust reports, there are today a number of firms, with significant financial support, trying even more ambitious systems.
  • Review: After Apollo

    23 Mar 2015 | 3:58 am
    Many people still consider John F. Kennedy as the president with the great influence on the American space program. Jeff Foust reviews a book that examines the historical record of another president who, in the long run, may have had a more significant effect on NASA's human spaceflight program.
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    NASA Watch

  • Twins in Space: More Smoke and Mirrors on NASA's Road to Mars

    Keith Cowing
    31 Mar 2015 | 3:17 pm
    Finding gene activity differences in identical twins, Ars Technica "They're called identical twins because their genomes are identical. But even though all of their DNA is the same, they clearly are not. The environment must play a role in how identical twins and everyone else uses their genes to become who they are." One if by Land, Two if by Space: Astronaut Twins Tantalize Human Research Possibilities in Spaceflight, NASA "A multitude of human research investigations currently are underway and are scheduled for upcoming expeditions aboard the space station by NASA and its international…
  • Making Space Policy In Secret (Again)

    Keith Cowing
    30 Mar 2015 | 5:16 pm
    Keith's note: It has been more than a month since the Pioneering Space National Summit was held in Washington, DC - an event whose attendees and discussions have remained more or less secret. Other than a paragraph with a bunch of random buzz words nothing has been heard from this group of space illuminati. Its as if their secret meeting never even happened. Now there is yet another closed door, off-the-record event being held in Washington in an undisclosed location for 2 days this week titled "Humans Orbiting Mars" sponsored by the Planetary Society (an organization that was not included in…
  • More Confusing Twitter Math From @NASA (Update)

    Keith Cowing
    30 Mar 2015 | 1:59 pm
    .@StationCDRKelly will see 10,944 sunrises & sunsets on #YearinSpace. Launch is at 3:42pm ET! http://t.co/bWiABIRo3S pic.twitter.com/Nz4hghoyiq— NASA (@NASA) March 27, 2015 Keith's note: Why is NASA saying that this is going to be a year-long mission? It is not. Close - but not a year. NASA goes out of their way to use simple math on Twitter to make their #YearInSpace point - but - that math also easily shows that Kelly is only going to be in space for 342 days. A year is 365 days long. I guess its too much to ask for NASA to be accurate on Twitter as it simultaneously hypes all of…
  • Finding Tatooine Just Got A Little Easier

    Keith Cowing
    30 Mar 2015 | 10:21 am
    Earth-like Tatooines From Star Wars May Be Common "Luke Skywalker's home in "Star Wars" is the desert planet Tatooine, with twin sunsets because it orbits two stars. So far, only uninhabitable gas-giant planets have been identified circling such binary stars, and many researchers believe rocky planets cannot form there. Now, mathematical simulations show that Earth-like, solid planets such as Tatooine likely exist and may be widespread."
  • Russian Deputy Prime Minister Tweets About Imaginary New Space Station

    Keith Cowing
    29 Mar 2015 | 6:04 pm
    http://t.co/jOamlzabNf Roscosmos and NASA will create a new orbital station The Russian Govt will examine (cont) http://t.co/pZPLBw4pcG— Dmitry Rogozin (@DRogozin) March 28, 2015
 
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    EurekAlert! - Space and Planetary Science

  • Astronomers discover likely precursors of galaxy clusters we see today

    30 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (University of Arizona) Observations made with two space observatories, Herschel and Planck, reveal glimpses into how today's galaxies came to be. Using one-of-a-kind instrumentation, astronomers at the University of Arizona were able to study large numbers of 'mystery galaxies' that appear to be associated with clusters.
  • NASA sees Maysak become a super typhoon

    30 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Typhoon Maysak as it strengthened into a super typhoon on March 31, reaching Category 5 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.
  • Advancing physics frontiers

    30 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (National Science Foundation) Whether they are describing the physics of how multicellular groups form from individual living cells, assembling the building blocks for quantum computing and quantum engineering, or investigating how massive elements came into being after our universe's beginning, the National Science Foundation's newest Physics Frontiers Center awardees represent the leading edge of physics research.
  • Planck: An 'unfocused' eye that sees the big picture

    30 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA)) Planck satellite helps to unveil the large-scale structure of the Universe.
  • Comet dust: Planet Mercury's 'invisible paint'

    29 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    (Brown University) Scientists have long puzzled over the planet Mercury's excessively dark surface. New research suggests that carbon from passing comets could be the planet's mystery darkening agent.
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    collectSPACE Today In Space History

  • SpaceShipOne lands

    30 Mar 2015 | 1:15 am
    The National Air and Space Museum lowered SpaceShipOne, the first privately-built crewed spaceplane, to the ground on Friday (March 27), after almost 10 years in 'Flight.' The spacecraft landed next to Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis as part of the renovations to the Boeing Milestones of Flight Gallery, to be completed by next year. When SpaceShipOne rises again, it will be in a new overhead location and different flight configuration.
  • 342 days off the planet

    27 Mar 2015 | 12:55 pm
    The next time that Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko step foot on Earth, the calendar will read March 2016. The astronaut and cosmonaut launched with cosmonaut Gennady Padalka aboard Soyuz TMA-16M to begin a historic first year-long mission on the International Space Station. Padalka will return to Earth in six months, but first he will set a new record for cumulative days in space, logging just under 900 days on five flights.
  • To boulder go

    25 Mar 2015 | 4:40 pm
    NASA's planned mission to redirect an asteroid into orbit about the moon will go with "Option B" and retrieve a boulder off of an asteroid rather than bag a complete space rock. The decision will give NASA the opportunity to use the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) to demonstrate deflecting an asteroid, as well as test out new capabilities needed to send astronauts deeper in space.
  • Scott Kelly's many mission patches

    24 Mar 2015 | 1:45 pm
    From his name tags found among rocket debris to the record number of flight insignia adorned with his name, the story behind Scott Kelly's many space mission patches is as dramatic as they are prolific. Set to launch Friday (March 27) to the International Space Station, Kelly together with cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko will spend a year in orbit collecting data to support even longer expeditions into deep space.
  • Gemini 3 at 50

    22 Mar 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Fifty years ago on Monday (March 23), NASA launched its first two-man crew on the maiden manned mission of the Gemini program. Gemini 3 commander Virgil "Gus" Grissom and pilot John Young orbited the Earth three times, during which they performed the first orbital maneuver by a crewed spacecraft. The two also set another, less important but perhaps better recognized first, smuggling the first corned beef sandwich into space.
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    Spacehack

  • Space Apps Challenge

    Ariel Waldman
    9 Mar 2015 | 4:35 pm
    A two-day hackathon-style event that invites people from around the world to create and collaborate on projects relevant to space exploration. The International Space Apps Challenge is a “technology development marathon”, where software developers, engineers, designers and technologists from around the world can mashup data, code and design to create clever solutions, explorations and experiments. Attendees can submit their own hack ideas or work on existing ones. Some hack ideas from 2012 included redesigning the Voyager Golden Record, creating better access to NASA data, mapping…
  • European Rover Challenge

    Ariel Waldman
    26 Jan 2015 | 5:02 pm
    NASA/JPL An international competition for university-level students/faculty to design, construct and operate a Mars rover. The competition challenges teams to create a Mars rover that can accomplish tasks in sample retrieval, “blind” terrain traversal, life support maintenance, and emergency repairs. Teams must design and build their own rover, but are allowed to use off-the-shelf components. A letter of intent to participate in the competition is due by March 31, 2015. Rovers are limited to costing no more than 15,000 EUR in parts, equipment and paid services. The competition…
  • Yuri’s Night

    Ariel Waldman
    25 Jan 2015 | 3:09 pm
    Whether in someone’s living room, a nightclub or a world-class science museum, all Yuri’s Night events have one thing in common – people who are excited about space exploration and who want to join together to celebrate it. Everyone around the world is encouraged to create their own Yuri’s Night event! “Let’s go!” These were the words spoken by Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin as he embarked on the historic first manned space flight on 12 April 1961. Twenty years later on 12 April 1981, the US launched the first space shuttle flight. That’s…
  • NASA Great Moonbuggy Race

    Ariel Waldman
    20 Jan 2015 | 1:52 am
    NASA/MSFC The annual Great Moonbuggy Race will be held April 17-18, 2015 in Huntsville, Alabama, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. Participating students will design a vehicle that addresses a series of engineering problems that are similar to problems faced by the original Moonbuggy team. Each Moonbuggy will be human powered and carry two students, one female and one male, over a half-mile simulated lunar terrain course including “craters”, rocks, “lava” ridges, inclines and “lunar” soil. Moonbuggy entries are expected to be of…
  • Cities at Night

    Ariel Waldman
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:29 pm
    ISS Expedition 30, NASA Classify photos taken by astronauts on the International Space Station to create a map of light pollution around the world. Light pollution is artificial light (such as street lamps) that results in masking the night sky, making it difficult to see the stars that would otherwise naturally appear to the naked eye. Light pollution is bad not only for blocking our ability to see the Milky Way, but it also can disrupt natural ecosystems. Around 1,200,000 images were taken aboard the International Space Station as of February 2014. However, the number of classified images…
 
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    The Daily Galaxy --Great Discoveries Channel: Sci, Space, Tech

  • Mystery of Extreme Continent Building Solved --A Key to Life on Earth and Beyond

    dailygalaxy.com
    31 Mar 2015 | 7:28 am
    "We've revealed a major unknown in the evolution of our planet," says Esteban Gazel, an assistant professor of geology with Virginia Tech. An international research team, led geoscientist Gazel, has revealed information about how continents were generated on Earth more than 2.5 billion years ago -- and how those processes have continued within the last 70 million years to profoundly affect the planet's life and climate. Published online today in Nature Geoscience, the study details how relatively recent geologic events -- volcanic activity 10 million years ago in what is now Panama and Costa…
  • Habitable Alien Planets of Binary Stars --"They May Be Hidden Behind Gas Giants"

    dailygalaxy.com
    30 Mar 2015 | 6:49 am
    Luke Skywalker’s home in “Star Wars” is the desert planet Tatooine, with twin sunsets because it orbits two stars. So far, only uninhabitable gas-giant planets have been identified circling such binary stars, and many researchers believe rocky planets cannot form there. Now, mathematical simulations show that Earthlike, solid planets such as Tatooine likely exist and may be widespread. “Tatooine sunsets may be common after all,” concludes the study by astrophysicists Ben Bromley of the University of Utah and Scott Kenyon of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. “Our main…
  • Astronomers Debate: "How Long Can a Technology-Based Civilization Last?" (Weekend Feature)

    dailygalaxy.com
    28 Mar 2015 | 8:19 am
    "We have no idea how long a technological civilization like our own can last," says University of Rochester astrophysicist Adam Frank. "Is it 200 years, 500 years or 50,000 years? Answering this question is at the root of all our concerns about the sustainability of human society. Are we the first and only technologically-intensive civilization in the entire history of the universe? If not, shouldn't we stand to learn something from the past successes and failures of other species?" Human-caused climate change, ocean acidification and species extinctions may eventually threaten the collapse…
  • Why the Quantum, Why the Universe --"Are Findings Pointing to a New Physics?"

    dailygalaxy.com
    27 Mar 2015 | 8:06 am
    The existence and stability of atoms relies heavily on the fact that neutrons are slightly more mas-sive than protons. The experimentally determined masses differ by only around 0.14 percent. A slightly smaller or larger value of the mass difference would have led to a dramatically different universe, with too many neutrons, not enough hydrogen, or too few heavier elements. The tiny mass difference is the reason why free neutrons decay on average after around ten minutes, while protons - the unchanging building blocks of matter - remain stable for a practically unlimited period. The fact that…
  • "The Dark World of Our Universe" --Astronomers Zeroing In on This Great Mystery

    dailygalaxy.com
    27 Mar 2015 | 7:29 am
    Dark matter is a giant question mark looming over our knowledge of the Universe. There is more dark matter in the Universe than visible matter, but it is extremely elusive; it does not reflect, absorb or emit light, making it invisible. Because of this, it is only known to exist via its gravitational effects on the visible Universe. A favored theory is that dark matter might be constituted of "supersymmetric" particles. Supersymmetry is a theory in which all particles in our Standard Model -- electrons, protons, neutrons, and so on -- have a more massive "supersymmetric" partner. While there…
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    AmericaSpace

  • Watch Curiosity’s Scars on Mars Change Over Time

    Ken Kremer
    31 Mar 2015 | 8:51 pm
    This sequence of images shows a blast zone where the sky crane from NASA’s Curiosity rover mission hit the ground after setting the rover down in August 2012, and how that dark scar’s appearance changed over the subsequent 30 months. The images are from HiRISE on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona [...]
  • Spacecraft Assembly Begins for NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission

    Mike Killian
    31 Mar 2015 | 4:34 pm
    Artist concept of OSIRIS-REx, the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth. Image Credit: NASA/Goddard The first United States mission in history to launch a robotic spacecraft to an asteroid, retrieve samples, and return those samples back to Earth for study just passed a big milestone in its development this [...]
  • Scott Kelly Describes Return to Space Station as ‘Coming to My Old Home’

    Ben Evans
    31 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
    Scott Kelly’s first selfie, taken after setting up camp in his crew quarters in the station’s Harmony node on 27/28 March 2015. Photo Credit: Scott Kelly/Twitter/NASA With about 1 percent of his 342-day mission—which began Thursday, with a rousing launch aboard Soyuz TMA-16M, from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan—now complete, U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly spoke [...]
  • NASA Says Webb Telescope Within Budget and On Track for 2018 Launch, GAO Not So Sure

    Mike Killian
    30 Mar 2015 | 3:03 pm
    Artist’s concept of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Image Credit: NASA/ESA The most sophisticated and ambitious space-based observatory ever conceived by the human mind continues to take shape through various aerospace centers across the country, where work is progressing steadily with development of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This year is a [...]
  • Ongoing Research and New Crew Arrival Highlight Busy Week on Orbit for Expedition 43

    Sherry Valare
    30 Mar 2015 | 9:35 am
    Scott Kelly, Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka joined their Expedition 43 crewmates Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov, and Samantha Cristoforetti in the Zvezda service module for a crew greeting ceremony. Photo: NASA SPACE STATION WEEKLY UPDATE March 23 – March 29, 2015 — The International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 43 crew members kept busy last week, [...]
 
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    Space Industry News

  • Naval Research Labs Researchers Pattern Magnetic Graphene

    William W.
    16 Mar 2015 | 1:53 pm
    Graphene, an atomically thin sheet of carbon, has been intensively studied for the last decade to reveal exceptional mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Recently, researchers have started to explore an even more surprising property—magnetism. Theories and experiments have suggested that either defects in graphene or chemical groups bound to graphene can cause it to exhibit magnetism; however, to date there was no way to create large-area magnetic graphene which could be easily patterned. Now, scientists from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have found a simple and robust…
  • NASA and Planetary Resources, Inc. Announce Results of the Asteroid Data Hunter Challenge

    William W.
    15 Mar 2015 | 3:51 pm
    New Desktop Application Has Potential to Increase Asteroid Detection, Now Available to Public A software application based on an algorithm created by a NASA challenge has the potential to increase the number of new asteroid discoveries by amateur astronomers. Analysis of images taken of our Solar System’s main belt asteroids between Mars and Jupiter using the algorithm showed a 15 percent increase in positive identification of new asteroids. During a panel Sunday at the South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference…
  • New NASA Mission to Study Ocean Color, Airborne Particles and Clouds

    NASA Press Release
    15 Mar 2015 | 11:00 am
    NASA is beginning work on a new satellite mission that will extend critical climate measurements of Earth’s oceans and atmosphere and advance studies of the impact of environmental changes on ocean health, fisheries and the carbon cycle. Tentatively scheduled to launch in 2022, the Pre-Aerosol Clouds and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will study Earth’s aquatic ecology and chemistry, and address the uncertainty in our understanding of how clouds and small airborne particles called aerosols affect Earth’s climate. PACE will be managed by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in…
  • Bitcoin Pioneer Inks Contract for Satellite Constellation

    William W.
    13 Mar 2015 | 4:25 pm
    Jeff Garzik’s Dunvegan Space Systems to Partner with Deep Space Industries on New Project Atlanta, GA – March 12, 2015.  Jeff Garzik, Bitcoin pioneer and CEO of Dunvegan Space Systems (DSS) announced he has signed a contract with Deep Space Industries (DSI) to build a 24 BitSat satellite constellation as the first element of a new strategic alliance between the two firms. The nanosats to be used in the Dunvegan constellation designed by DSI provide an order of magnitude cost advantage over traditional telecommunication satellites.  Based on the industry standard Cubesat form factor,…
  • NASA finds Jupiter moon harbors more salt water than on all of Earth

    William W.
    12 Mar 2015 | 6:00 pm
    NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has the best evidence yet for an underground saltwater ocean on Ganymede, Jupiter’s largest moon. The subterranean ocean is thought to have more water than all the water on Earth’s surface. Identifying liquid water is crucial in the search for habitable worlds beyond Earth and for the search of life as we know it. “This discovery marks a significant milestone, highlighting what only Hubble can accomplish,” said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, Washington. “In its 25 years in…
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    Space Facts

  • New Horizons Mission & Spacecraft Facts

    Chris
    25 Mar 2015 | 1:40 pm
    NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is on a mission to collect data and images of the dwarf planet Pluto, its surrounding moons and other objects in the Kuiper Belt. An earlier mission, named the Pluto Kuiper Express, was cancelled by NASA in 2000 due to funding issues, yet six years later the New Horizons mission was launched. Mission […] The post New Horizons Mission & Spacecraft Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Whirlpool Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    16 Mar 2015 | 3:13 pm
    The Whirlpool Galaxy is a familiar one to stargazers and among the many close galaxy neighbors to our own Milky Way. Because of its shape, it was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral by astronomers. Today, it interests astronomers due to its spiral structure and the interaction it appears to be having […] The post Whirlpool Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Dawn Mission & Spacecraft Facts

    Chris
    18 Feb 2015 | 12:22 pm
    NASA’s Dawn spacecraft is on a mission to explore the two largest objects in the asteroid belt the asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, gathering data relating to their composition, internal structure, density and shape. The main objectives of the mission are to gather data to aid further understanding of the role that size and water […] The post Dawn Mission & Spacecraft Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Sombrero Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    12 Feb 2015 | 2:24 pm
    The Sombrero Galaxy is one of the most unusual looking barred spiral galaxies visible from Earth. Its bright nucleus, large central bulge and spiral arms threaded through with a thick dust lane make it look a little like a hat from Mexico. The dust lane is a ring that circles the bulge of the galaxy, and […] The post Sombrero Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Milky Way Galaxy Facts

    Chris
    12 Feb 2015 | 1:54 pm
    The Milky Way Galaxy is our home galaxy in the universe. It is a fairly typical barred spiral with four major arms in its disk, at least one spur, and a newly discovered outer arm. The galactic centre, which is located about 26,000 light-years from Earth, contains at least one supermassive black hole (called Sagittarius […] The post Milky Way Galaxy Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
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    Space Safety Magazine

  • Invasion of Space Germs: Yesterday and Today

    Tereza Pultarova
    10 Mar 2015 | 5:00 pm
    As  prospects of a Mars sample return mission or even a manned mission to Mars are becoming increasingly realistic, the danger of biologic invasions from space or, on the other hand, the danger of contaminating other celestial bodies with terrestrial microbes attracts more of the scientific community’s attention.There is obviously reason to worry. There are many examples... Read more → The post Invasion of Space Germs: Yesterday and Today from Tereza Pultarova appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Book Review: The Martian, By Andy Weir

    Michael Ciancone
    9 Mar 2015 | 3:27 pm
    Here’s a story that will light the rocket of most any techno-geek. A hero in a desperate situation who endeavors to survive a hostile and unforgiving environment. All we’re missing is a love interest. Oh, wait, he’s a techno-geek too. Never mind. According to the author’s end-notes, this story was written as a series of... Read more → The post Book Review: The Martian, By Andy Weir from Michael Ciancone appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Progress 58 Booster Captured in Very Low Orbit

    Ralf Vandebergh
    27 Feb 2015 | 12:06 pm
    The Soyuz upper stage of the recent Progress 58 launch on February 17 passed a day later at just 166 kilometers above the ground with an angular speed of more then 2 degrees per second, rawly twice the angular speed of the ISS. The booster reentered the Earth atmosphere 10 hours later. The object was tumbling... Read more → The post Progress 58 Booster Captured in Very Low Orbit from Ralf Vandebergh appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Space Economy Trends in the United States and Europe

    Violetta Orban
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:00 am
    USA and Europe are two major actors in the international space arena. Considering their relevant engagement in space, the analysis of the industrial scenarios, projects and budgetary lines of the USA and Europe aims at outlining their role in global space economy to better understand the current and future trends of the sector at international... Read more → The post Space Economy Trends in the United States and Europe from Violetta Orban appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • Houston? Where is the closest Hospital?

    Antoine Amrouni-Keiling
    20 Feb 2015 | 6:26 am
    In several episodes of the Star Trek series, Dr. McCoy, the very crude chief medical officer onboard the USS Entreprise, refers to medical professionals of our times as people from the dark ages, far from the extraordinary capabilities of the doctor’s medical bay. While Dr. McCoy might show disdain in the way our medicine operates,... Read more → The post Houston? Where is the closest Hospital? from Antoine Amrouni-Keiling appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
 
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    What Is Universe?

  • Gravitational Wave Research

    20 Mar 2015 | 1:00 am
    The more we understand gravitational waves, the better we can understand gravity itself. The technologies involved are themselves special. To measure a millionth of a millionth of a meter over the timescales involved is a breakthrough in the field of measurement and studying light and optics.
  • Fantasy Meets Stark Realities

    10 Mar 2015 | 9:00 am
    Today, pseudoscience is more akin to politics and diplomacy: as in the art of the possible. It is now a bridge between science fiction and fact, via genuine enquiry and imagination that now have outlets in the visual media.
  • Apocalypse

    18 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    What are the global killers going to be? How, if at all, can we prepare for those? And can we safely make some assumptions about their possibility, without in actual fact inducing a premature panic for their probability?
  • Moon Landings

    1 Feb 2015 | 12:10 am
    The Moon Landings. Real thing or reel hoax?
  • Spy-fi

    25 Jan 2015 | 4:00 am
    The first of many. A writer and a scientist debate the merits of Iron Man, James Bond, and Star Wars for 2015.
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