Space

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  • China's Secret Moon Mission

    Space News From SpaceDaily.Com
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Sydney, Australia (SPX) Oct 23, 2014 Soon, a rocket will launch a Chinese spacecraft to the Moon and back. It's the first time that China has attempted this long and perilous journey. It should be a great achievement for the nation, worthy of extensive publicity. Ironically, this mission has been shrouded in more obscurity than the "secret" X-37B spaceplane operated by the US Air Force, which even had its re-entry pre-announced and
  • The New Chinooks: Boeing’s Modern H-47 Heavy-Lift Helicopters

    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy
    Joe Katzman
    19 Oct 2014 | 9:01 am
    CH-47Fs take off(click to view full) DII FOCUS articles offer in-depth, updated looks at significant military programs of record; this FOCUS Article covers the CH-47F/MH-47G Chinook helicopter programs, in the USA and abroad. These helicopters’ distinctive “flying banana” twin-rotor design stems from the brilliant work of aviation pioneer Frank Piasecki. It gives Chinooks the ability to adjust their positioning very precisely, while carrying a large airframe whose load capacity has made it the world’s most popular heavy-lift helicopter. The USA expects to be operating…
  • NASA’s Opportunity Rover Snaps First-Ever Comet Image From Mars’ Surface During Comet’s Ultra-Close Martian Flyby

    AmericaSpace
    Ken Kremer
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:11 pm
    NASA’s Opportunity rover snaps this first-ever image of a comet (fuzzy object at center) from another planet’s surface during close flyby of Comet Siding Spring with Mars on Oct. 19, 2014. This pancam raw image was taken on Sol 3817. Inset shows enhanced view revealing more comet detail. Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU/TAMU. Image Processing: Marco Di [...]
  • U.S. Navy’s New Hawkeye Optimized For Land, Sea Ops

    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News
    27 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    New E-2D radar to counter cruise missile threats over land and sea The new Hawkeye provides a much improved UHF radar antenna useful for finding targets that are hard to see in other bands, such as cruise missiles and aircraft with low radar cross sections, which are types of threats to carrier strike groups that worry Navy officials. read more
  • U.S Navy sending Aegis-equipped destroyers to Japan

    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Washington (UPI) Oct 22, 2014 Two U.S. Navy destroyers with ballistic missile defense capabilities are being forward deployed to Japan, the U.S. Navy announced. The ships with Aegis systems are the USS Benfold (DDG 65) and USS Milius (DDG 69), both of which are currently homeported in San Diego, Calif. The two ships will become part of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces based at Yokosuka, Japan. The USS
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    Aviation Week - Aerospace Defense, Business & Commercial News

  • U.S. Navy’s New Hawkeye Optimized For Land, Sea Ops

    27 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    New E-2D radar to counter cruise missile threats over land and sea The new Hawkeye provides a much improved UHF radar antenna useful for finding targets that are hard to see in other bands, such as cruise missiles and aircraft with low radar cross sections, which are types of threats to carrier strike groups that worry Navy officials. read more
  • Rockwell Collins Extends Fusion Avionics From Manned Into Unmanned

    27 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Certified manned-aircraft avionics could help UAS enter civil skies Steeped in manned-aircraft experience but with a burgeoning unmanned-aircraft avionics business, Rockwell Collins is working to help UAVs fly in the national airspace system. With NASA, the company is developing a certifiable command-and-control data link allowing multiple unmanned aircraft systems to be flown from a single ground station. And now Rockwell Collins has shown that certified manned-aircraft avionics can be used in a UAS without breaking the certification chain of evidence. read more
  • E-2D Hawkeye Gains Aerial Refueling Capability

    27 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    The aerial refueling capability will extend the range and persistence of the U.S. Navy’s Northrop Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye to at least 7 hr., up from the current 4-6 hr. read more
  • Upcoming Events

    27 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Nov. 3-5—52nd Annual SAFE Symposium. Caribe Royale Hotel & Convention Center, Orlando, Florida. www.safeassociation.com Nov. 3-5—SpeedNews 19th Annual Regional and Business Aviation Industry Suppliers Conference. Montelucia Paradise Valley, Scottsdale, Arizona. See speednews.com/ Nov. 4-6—Flight Test Safety Committee’s Eighth Annual European Flight Test Safety Workshop. Manching, Germany. See www.setp.org/symposium/meetings/european-workshop  read more
  • Is A Republican Senate Good For Defense?

    27 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Some see a Republican-controlled Senate as a plus for the Pentagon No matter who holds the majority in the Senate after the November midterm election, the fate of defense spending in the fiscal 2016 budget will be tied up in a larger tangle of spending issues. The desire of some Republicans to retain or enlarge the defense budget is competing with the wish of Democrats to increase spending on infrastructure and other domestic programs, and Congress is perennially unable to agree on tax increases or entitlement savings that could pay for either priority. read more
 
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    Military Space News, Nuclear Weapons, Missile Defense

  • U.S Navy sending Aegis-equipped destroyers to Japan

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Washington (UPI) Oct 22, 2014 Two U.S. Navy destroyers with ballistic missile defense capabilities are being forward deployed to Japan, the U.S. Navy announced. The ships with Aegis systems are the USS Benfold (DDG 65) and USS Milius (DDG 69), both of which are currently homeported in San Diego, Calif. The two ships will become part of the Forward Deployed Naval Forces based at Yokosuka, Japan. The USS
  • Japan deputy PM directly urges China to hold summit

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Beijing (AFP) Oct 22, 2014 Japan's deputy prime minister on Wednesday urged China to allow a summit between the Asian rivals as he met a top Beijing official, he said. Taro Aso and China's Vice-Premier Zhang Gaoli briefly chatted on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) finance ministers' gathering in Beijing, ahead of the forum's annual summit next month. Aso, who is also Tokyo's finance m
  • China Launches New Satellite Via Orbital Carrier Rocket

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 22, 2014 China has launched its new Yaogan-22 remote sensing optical satellite into scheduled orbit Monday, Chinese News Service reported. The satellite was launched atop a Long March 4C rocket, which blasted off from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, a Chinese space and defense launch facility and a spaceport. The satellite will be used for scientific exploration purposes, natural resourc
  • Russia spy plane intercepted in NATO airspace: alliance

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Brussels (AFP) Oct 22, 2014 NATO fighter jets intercepted a Russian spy plane over the Baltic Sea after it breached Estonian airspace, the alliance said Wednesday in the latest of such incidents amid tensions with Moscow over Ukraine. The Ilyushin IL-20 "intelligence collection aircraft", which took off from the Russian Baltic coast enclave of Kaliningrad on Tuesday, was first intercepted by Danish F-16 jets when it ap
  • Iraq asks for 46,000 M1A1 Abrams tank rounds

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Washington (UPI) Oct 21, 2014 The sale of thousands of rounds of tank ammunition to Iraq under the Foreign Military Sales program has been presented to Congress The proposed sale was detailed by the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency, which said the U.S. State Department had already given its approval for the deal, which carries a value of an estimated $600 million. "The proposed sale of the ammunition
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    DID: Department of Defense News, Procurement, Acquisition & Contracting, National Security Policy

  • Iraq/Syria: Is ISIS Flying Jets? UK to Deploy Reapers

    Olivier Travers
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:58 am
    Is ISIL operating jets, as the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights claims? There’s a Youtube video purportedly showing a jet landing at an ISIS-controlled base, but USCENTOM says they haven’t seen any evidence. This is a head-scratcher. Iraq floundered against a purged and weakened Iranian military for years, then their generals join ISIS which quickly becomes really competent? From which we may infer the “Saddam performance penalty” levied on Iraq’s Ba’athist military. Meanwhile, the Maliki performance penalty still applies to the Shi’ite…
  • Anti-Submarine Weakness: India Has a Problem

    Joe Katzman
    19 Oct 2014 | 1:52 pm
    Indian Ka-28(click to view larger) In September 2008, Flight International reported that India’s defence ministry has issued a tender for “advanced multirole naval helicopters” to several manufacturers around the world, including AgustaWestland, EADS and Sikorsky. The initial RFP reportedly covered 16 helicopters, with a potential expansion to 60 helicopters. The problem, as usual, is that nothing is happening, while critical Indian defenses rot. India’s naval sphere of influence is growing, and the country purchased long-range P-8i jets to improve its territorial…
  • UK’s Eurofighters Fly To Availability-Based Contracting

    Joe Katzman
    19 Oct 2014 | 12:20 pm
    New dawn?(click to view full) Implementation of Britain’s “future contracting for availability” approach of paying for machines in service, rather than parts and hours, generally involves a phased set of contracts and agreements. As each party’s understanding the risks and demands grow, the contract’s complexity and comprehensiveness grow as well, and the framework moves closer and closer to the desired goal of a full availability contract. “Britain Hammers Out Through-Life Support Framework for Tornado Fleet” described how this approach works on the…
  • APKWS II: Laser-Guided Hydra Rockets in Production At Last

    Joe Katzman
    19 Oct 2014 | 10:33 am
    Hydras & Hellfires(click to view full) The versatile Hydra 70mm rocket family is primed for a new lease on life, thanks to widespread programs aimed at converting these ubiquitous rockets into cheap laser-guided precision weapons. Conversion benefits include cost, use on both helicopters and fighters, more precision weapons per platform, low collateral damage, and the activation of large weapon stockpiles that couldn’t be used under strict rules of engagement. Firms all over the world have grasped this opportunity, which explains why strong competition has emerged from all points…
  • The New Chinooks: Boeing’s Modern H-47 Heavy-Lift Helicopters

    Joe Katzman
    19 Oct 2014 | 9:01 am
    CH-47Fs take off(click to view full) DII FOCUS articles offer in-depth, updated looks at significant military programs of record; this FOCUS Article covers the CH-47F/MH-47G Chinook helicopter programs, in the USA and abroad. These helicopters’ distinctive “flying banana” twin-rotor design stems from the brilliant work of aviation pioneer Frank Piasecki. It gives Chinooks the ability to adjust their positioning very precisely, while carrying a large airframe whose load capacity has made it the world’s most popular heavy-lift helicopter. The USA expects to be operating…
 
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    Space News From SpaceDaily.Com

  • China's Secret Moon Mission

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Sydney, Australia (SPX) Oct 23, 2014 Soon, a rocket will launch a Chinese spacecraft to the Moon and back. It's the first time that China has attempted this long and perilous journey. It should be a great achievement for the nation, worthy of extensive publicity. Ironically, this mission has been shrouded in more obscurity than the "secret" X-37B spaceplane operated by the US Air Force, which even had its re-entry pre-announced and
  • ESA spaceplane progressing towards Vega launch

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Kourou, French Guiana (ESA) Oct 23, 2014 Europe's Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) spaceplane has completed another step in its pre-launch checkout process, and is now being readied for fueling ahead of the November 18 flight with Arianespace's lightweight Vega. This activity - which included IXV's fit-check on the adapter that will serve as its interface with the Vega launcher - occurred inside the Spaceport's S1B clean r
  • Russia to Orbit 9 MilCom Satellites by 2020

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 21, 2014 The Russian military will add nine advanced communications satellites to its orbital grouping by 2020, a senior military commander said Monday. "By 2020, the orbital grouping of military communications satellites will be strengthened with nine modern satellites," Maj. Gen. Khalil Arslanov, the chief of the Main Communications Directorate of the Russian Armed Forces, said Monday. Arsl
  • Proton-M Lofts Express-AM6 Satellite

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Moscow (RIA Novosti) Oct 23, 2014 Russia launched on Tuesday an Express-series communications satellite on board the Proton-M carrier rocket from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan, Federal Space Agency Roscosmos said. "The launch took place as scheduled at 07.09 p.m. Moscow time [15:09 GMT]," a Roscosmos spokesman told RIA Novosti. "The separation of the satellite from the Briz-M booster is expected at 04.31 a.
  • China Completes Country's Largest Spaceport

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:54 am
    Beijing (RIA Novosti) Oct 21, 2014 Construction of the fourth and the largest spaceport in China in the country's southern city of Wenchang has been completed and it is ready for launch, People's Daily reported Friday. Completion of the new spaceport, which is located in the island province of Hainan, means that the launch of manned and unmanned missions to current and future space stations, the Moon and Mars are "just a ma
 
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    Science@NASA Headline News

  • Sunset Solar Eclipse

    17 Oct 2014 | 4:45 pm
    On October 23rd, the Moon will pass in front of the sun, off-center, producing a partial solar eclipse visible in most of the United States.
  • 2014 Orionid Meteor Shower

    17 Oct 2014 | 11:10 am
    Earth is entering a stream of debris from Halley's Comet, parent of the annual Orionid meteor shower. Forecasters expect the shower to peak on Tuesday, Oct. 21st.
  • Where will New Horizons Go After Pluto?

    16 Oct 2014 | 5:36 pm
    Peering out to the dim, outer reaches of our solar system, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered three Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) the agency’s New Horizons spacecraft could potentially visit after it flies by Pluto in July 2015.
  • The Cloudy Future of Arctic Sea Ice

    15 Oct 2014 | 9:05 am
    As climate change continues to hammer Arctic sea ice, pushing back its summertime boundaries to record-high latitudes, NASA is flying an innovative airborne mission to find out how these developments will affect worldwide weather.
  • Evidence for Young Lunar Volcanism

    12 Oct 2014 | 10:15 pm
    NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has found strong evidence of geologically young volcanic activity on the moon. Some deposits appear to be less than 100 million years old, corresponding to Earth's Cretaceous period, the heyday of dinosaurs.
 
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    Universe Today

  • Assembly Complete for NASA’s Maiden Orion Spacecraft Launching in December 2014

    Ken Kremer
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:57 pm
    Technicians complete final assembly of NASA’s first Orion spacecraft with installation of the close out panels on the Launch Abort System that smooth airflow. Credit: Photo credit: Kim Shiflett Technicians at the Kennedy Space Center have completed the final major assembly work on NASA’s maiden Orion crew module slated to launch on its first unmanned orbital test flight this December, dubbed Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) After first attaching the Launch Abort System (LAS) to the top of the capsule, engineers carefully installed a fairing composed of (...)Read the rest of Assembly…
  • Is Dark Matter Coming From The Sun?

    Matt Williams
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:43 pm
    A huge filament erupts from the Sun in 2012. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center For decades, astronomers and cosmologists have postulated that the Universe is filled with an invisible, mysterious mass known as “dark matter.” For decades, the search for this elusive matter has dominated the field of cosmology. Precise measurements were obtained over 20 years ago when dark matter was first mapped in galaxy halos. Only recently has the existence of dark matter over much larger scales than even galaxy clusters been detected. Recently, a group of physicists analyzed over 12…
  • Beastly Sunspot Amazes, Heightens Eclipse Excitement

    Bob King
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:09 am
    Ron Cottrell captured the sunspot group 2192 in all its swirly magnetic goodness in hydrogen-alpha light on October 19. To appreciate its size, he included the Earth (lower left) for reference. Credit: Ron Cottrell That’s one big, black blemish on the Sun today! Rarely have we been witness to such an enormous sunspot. Lifting the #14 welder’s glass to my eyes this morning I about jumped back and bumped into the garage. (...)Read the rest of Beastly Sunspot Amazes, Heightens Eclipse Excitement (733 words) © Bob King for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | One comment | Post tags:…
  • X-Ray Telescope Cracks Open Archives, Comes Up With Gassy Black Hole Gem

    Elizabeth Howell
    22 Oct 2014 | 9:18 am
    Six images that combine Chandra data with those from other telescopes. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO, Optical: NASA/STScI, Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA). What a gem! This huge black hole in the middle of Hercules A is making gas around it super-heated to millions of degrees, making it shine brightly in X-Rays. The Chandra X-Ray Telescope captured the scene and in a new data release this week, telescope officials cracked open the archives to give us gems such as this. (...)Read the rest of X-Ray Telescope Cracks Open Archives, Comes Up With Gassy Black Hole Gem (119 words) © Elizabeth Howell for…
  • No, This Is Not a Photo of India on Diwali

    Jason Major
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:39 am
    Yes, it’s India, but it’s not a photo captured from space during Diwali night. (Credit: NOAA) Diwali, the Indian festival of lights, falls on Thursday, Oct. 23 this year and with it come celebrations, gift-giving, and brilliant lighting and firework displays all across the subcontinent of India… but this isn’t a picture of that. What is it exactly? Find out below… (...)Read the rest of No, This Is Not a Photo of India on Diwali (258 words) © Jason Major for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: Diwali, Diwali night, India, NASA, satellite,…
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    The Space Review

  • Close encounters of the top secret kind

    20 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    In 1969, a Soviet spy satellite passed closed to an American one. Dwayne Day examines whether this was a deliberate attempt by the Soviets to image the American satellite -- or even test an ASAT system -- or just a coincidence.
  • Commercial crew's extended endgame

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:59 am
    Last month, NASA awarded contracts for commercial crew systems that were expected to end months of uncertainty about the program's future. However, Jeff Foust reports that the uncertainty lingers today, as one company protests those awards while also working on alternative plans for its vehicle design.
  • Powering cislunar spaceflight with NEO powder

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:58 am
    NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission plans to use xenon as the propellant for ion propulsion systems that will nudge a small asteroid into lunar orbit. Ronald Menich argues that using NEO materials themselves is a more sustainable approach to developing long-term cislunar infrastructure.
  • Big data computing above the clouds

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:57 am
    Data centers, the essential if invisible component of cloud computing, require large amounts of power and cooling to operate effectively. Vid Beldavs describes one solution that would put cloud computing literally above the clouds, in orbit.
  • Review: Mars Rover Curiosity

    20 Oct 2014 | 3:56 am
    More than two years after landing, the Mars rover Curiosity has helped scientists make fundamental discoveries about the Red Planet. Jeff Foust reviews a book by the mission's chief engineer that examines the significant challenges NASA faced in developing the spacecraft.
 
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    NASA Watch

  • Major Problem With NWS Satellite Data Continues

    Keith Cowing
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:40 pm
    Weather Service stops receiving satellite data, issues notice about forecast quality, Washington Post "Since at least Tuesday, some satellite data - an important input to weather prediction models - has stopped flowing into the National Weather Service due to an apparent network outage." National Weather Service National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Satellite Data Outage "THE FOLLOWING DATA TYPES CONTINUE TO BE UNAVAILABLE FOR THE MODELS. MODIS IR AND WV WINDS OMI OZONE DATA AIRS HYPERSPECTRAL SOUNDER DATA COSMIC GPS-RADIO OCCULTATION DATA NESDIS CONTINUES TO WORK ON RESTORING…
  • Congress Has Questions for NASA

    Keith Cowing
    22 Oct 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Letter from House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology to NASA "On August 27, 2014, we wrote you to request an update on the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion crew vehicle shortly after NASA conducted its Key Decision Point C (KDP-C) review 1. We asked for a response by September 10, 2014. To date, we have only received an acknowledgement of the letter's receipt. ... Finally, on September 16, 2014, Subcommittee staff reached out to NASA in order to gain support for facilitating a briefing on the Commercial Crew Transportation Capabilities (CCtCap) contract source selection, as…
  • Sen. Coburn Is Very Confused About NASA's Budget

    Keith Cowing
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:04 am
    Coburn's 'Wastebook' Targets Include Mountain Lions, Sheep, Beer, Roll Call "NASA draws criticism in a few areas, with Coburn skeptical of the costs associated with the International Space Station itself, including the presence of experiments designed by students. "Some of the other studies being conducted on the space station are designed by elementary and high school students rather than scientists. Fifteen student projects were launched to the space station in July as part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP)," the report said. "While encouraging young people to take an…
  • Sierra Nevada's CCtCap Scorched Earth Policy - Fizzles

    Keith Cowing
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:58 am
    Sierra Nevada Files Suit To Reinstate Hold on Commercial Crew Contracts "In filings with the U.S. Court of Federal Claims in Washington, Sierra Nevada filed requests for both a temporary restraining order and a preliminary injunction to overturn a NASA decision Oct. 9 lifting an order stopping work on Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contracts awarded Sept. 16 to Boeing and Space Exploration Technologies Corp." - Why Sierra Nevada Did Not Win Any Commercial Crew Funds, earlier post - NASA Tells Boeing and SpaceX to Proceed Despite SNC Protest, earlier post - Sierra Nevada…
  • Hacked Kepler Continues to Amaze

    Keith Cowing
    21 Oct 2014 | 8:39 pm
    Sun's stroke keeps Kepler online, Nature "Wiemer had fashioned a crutch for Kepler using the only resource available: sunlight. Positioned so that its long side faces the Sun, the spacecraft leans against the pressure created by the onslaught of photons and balances using its two good wheels. With this approach, the team hoped to get within a factor of ten of Kepler's original performance -- but with additional software refinements, NASA's Kepler project manager Charlie Sobeck says that it is better than that, more like a factor of two or three. Wiemer thinks that further tweaks will close…
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    EurekAlert! - Space and Planetary Science

  • Superstring theorist at University of Florida wins 2015 Heineman Prize

    22 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (American Institute of Physics) The American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics announced today that theoretical physicist Pierre Ramond, director of the Institute for Fundamental Theory at the University of Florida, has won the 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics -- one of the highest honors for scientific investigators in that field.
  • Two families of comets found around nearby star

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (ESO) The HARPS instrument at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile has been used to make the most complete census of comets around another star. Astronomers have studied nearly 500 individual comets orbiting the star Beta Pictoris and have discovered that they belong to two distinct families of exocomets: old exocomets that have made multiple passages near the star, and younger exocomets that probably came from the recent breakup of one or more larger objects.
  • NASA's TRMM Satellite calculates Hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo rainfall

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA used TRMM and other satellite data to calculate rainfall from Atlantic hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo.
  • NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Satellite team ward off recent space debris threat

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Space debris, also known as 'space junk,' is an ongoing real-life concern for teams managing satellites orbiting Earth, including NOAA-NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, satellite. It is not unusual for satellites that have the capability of maneuvering to be repositioned to avoid debris or to maintain the proper orbit.
  • NASA-led study sees Titan glowing at dusk and dawn

    21 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.
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    collectSPACE Today In Space History

  • Shuttle doors shut

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:15 pm
    The California Science Center closed out the 'Go for Payload' phase of its future space shuttle Endeavour display plans on Tuesday (Oct. 21), shutting the two doors on the retired orbiter's cargo bay. Over the past three weeks, the science center outfitted the hold with a flown Spacehab module and replica parts to prepare Endeavour for its vertical exhibit, slated to open in 2018.
  • Alan Bean Plus Four

    20 Oct 2014 | 4:20 pm
    Tom Hanks imagines a modern-day bootstrap mission to the moon in "Alan Bean Plus Four," an original work of fiction in the current issue (Oct. 27) of "The New Yorker." The actor, who's no stranger to playing an astronaut, crafts a tale of four friends who travel around the moon in a way less complicated way than Alan Bean did aboard Apollo 12, 45 years ago this November.
  • 675 days in orbit

    17 Oct 2014 | 3:30 pm
    For almost two years, the U.S. Air Force's X-37B reusable space plane orbited the Earth conducting a secretive test mission. On Friday (Oct. 17), it returned to a landing in California after 675 days in space. The touchdown on a runway at Vandenberg Air Force Base marked the end of the X-37B program's third mission, with a fourth flight planned for 2015. Built by Boeing, the orbital test vehicle used on this mission previously flew in 2010.
  • Flight of the Phoenix

    15 Oct 2014 | 10:25 am
    As perhaps a patch before its time, the Apollo 7 crew's first idea for their mission's official insignia was to pay tribute to the fallen Apollo 1 crew. Overruled by NASA, the Phoenix-themed patch did not become a reality until 45 years later, when astronaut Walt Cunningham had it made as a commemorative emblem.
  • Astronaut Wives Club

    13 Oct 2014 | 5:20 am
    ABC's limited event 10-episode TV series, "The Astronaut Wives Club" has finally leapt off the launch pad and begun filming in New Orleans. Based on the 2013 bestselling book by author Lily Koppel, the series has completed casting seven actresses to play the spouses of the Mercury 7 astronauts, but plans to grow the cast to include the Gemini and Apollo wives, too.
 
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    The Daily Galaxy --Great Discoveries Channel: Sci, Space, Tech

  • Colossal Burst from a Neutron Star Detected --"At a Frequency Never Seen Before and Which We Still Do Not Understand"

    dailygalaxy.com
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:53 am
    NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected a rapid-fire "storm" of high-energy blasts from a highly magnetized neutron star, also called a magnetar, on Jan. 22, 2009. Now astronomers analyzing this data have discovered underlying signals related to seismic waves rippling throughout the magnetar. A rupture in the crust of a highly magnetized neutron star can trigger high-energy eruptions. Fermi observations of these blasts include information on how the star's surface twists and vibrates, providing new insights into what lies beneath.  Such signals were first identified during the…
  • "Brain" of James Webb Space Telescope Emerges Unscathed from Interstellar Freeze Test

    dailygalaxy.com
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:15 am
    After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Teams of engineers and technicians have been on heart-monitoring duty around the clock since this complicated assembly was lowered into the chamber for its summer-long test. The Webb will be the most powerful space telescope ever built. Engineer Mike Drury, the ISIM Lead…
  • Signals from the Edge of the Observable Universe

    dailygalaxy.com
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:49 am
    It is extremely difficult to gather information about galaxies at the edge of the Universe: the signals from these heavenly bodies "dilute" in the course of their billion-year journey through space toward earth, making them difficult observational targets. Estimating how much molecular hydrogen is present in these galaxies is particularly challenging: the molecule emits almost no radiation. Nevertheless, Astrophysicists are keen to map the abundance of this element: molecular hydrogen is the fundamental building block for new stars; the more of it contained within a particular galaxy, the…
  • Solar Winds Could Stymie Manned Space-Age Missions

    dailygalaxy.com
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky, concludes a new paper by University of New Hampshire scientists. In a paper published online in the journal Space Weather, associate professor Nathan Schwadron of the UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) and the department of physics says that due to a highly abnormal and extended lack of solar activity, the solar wind is exhibiting extremely low densities and magnetic field…
  • Searching Kepler Mission's 4,000 Planets for Hints of Habitable Moons

    dailygalaxy.com
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:48 am
    A wealth of moons exist in our own solar system that could host life. Icy Europa, which is circling Jupiter, was recently discovered to have plumes of water erupting from its surface. Titan, in orbit around Saturn, is the only known moon with an atmosphere, and could have the precursor elements to life in its hydrocarbon seas that are warmed by Saturn’s heat. Other candidates for extraterrestrial hosts include Jupiter’s moons Callisto and Ganymede, as well as Saturn’s satellite Enceladus. But René Heller, an astrophysicist at the Origins Institute at McMaster University, belives some…
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    TimeHuman

  • Is The Chupacabra Real?

    Admin
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:51 am
    Is the Chupacabra real? The video below explains the possible species connections the Chupacabra could have. For example, is it a rat/kangaroo mix? Or what? Is the Chupacabra a new species all together? Is it a cross between two species?Many of the sightings that are hyped in the media are always proven false. That doesn't mean the Chupacabra isn't real. Nature can do weird things, and the idea of strange mutations isn't a crazy one. Until caught, the Chupacabra will remain reclusive, and mythological. The truth is out there.
  • The Real Sounds Of Hell

    Admin
    28 Sep 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Researchers from a remote part of Siberia claim to have recorded real sounds from hell. They drilled a hole roughly 14 kilometers deep into earth's crust. The researchers noted an unusual amount of heat coming from the hole. After dropping ultra-sensitive microphones into the hole--to measure the earth's movements--they discovered strange feedback coming into the mics. The video below is a sample of what they recorded. It's the real sounds of hell. Maybe...If you get scared easily, don't watch the video. I warned you.'The last discovery was nevertheless the most shocking to our ears, so much…
  • Cold Weight Loss Benefits Without The Cold

    Admin
    7 Jun 2014 | 8:26 pm
    Brr-brr-brr! Scientists have discovered a way to make the body of mice burn calories as if they were exposed to the freezing cold. A potential future treatment for obesity in humans!White fat to brown fat Humans are born with a decent amount of brown fat. Brown fat is the fat best used for insulation from the cold. White fat stores energy, while brown fat is the energy burner--which comes in really handy when you want to lose some weight. Sadly, as we humans get older, brown fat seems to disappear. Ajay Chawla (UC), San Fran, and his team injected obese mice with interleukin-4 (a…
  • Most fascinating science news of the week (Dec 15, 2012)

    Admin
    15 Dec 2012 | 5:04 pm
    Here are some of the most fascinating science news stories of the week:CU-Boulder team develops swarm of pingpong ball-sized robotsUniversity of Colorado Boulder Assistant Professor Nikolaus Correll likes to think in multiples. If one robot can accomplish a singular task, think how much more could be accomplished if you had hundreds of them. Read more: http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2012/12/14/cu-boulder-team-develops-swarm-pingpong-ball-sized-robotsAstronomers discover 'missing link' of black holes The discovery of a bingeing black hole in our nearest neighbouring galaxy,…
  • Geminid meteor shower live stream

    Admin
    13 Dec 2012 | 6:34 pm
    The Geminid meteor shower occurs on an annual basis, when the extinct comet 3200 Phaethon sprinkles the Earth with its debris tail. Get outside tonight between midnight and 3 a.m. to catch a glimpse of this amazing spectacle.Expect to see roughly 100+ meteors per hour during the peak at 2-3 a.m.If you can't get out to see Geminid, NASA will be live streaming the event via a camera at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Below is the embedded live stream:If you would like to go directly to the NASA live stream event, here's the link:…
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    Icarus Interstellar » Icarus Interstellar | A nonprofit foundation dedicated to achieving interstellar flight by 2100.

  • Interstellar Comparisons

    Adam Crowl
    1 Oct 2014 | 6:13 am
    Terraformed Venus (a Wikipedia Image) Travelling to the stars within a human lifetime via the known laws of physics requires energies millions of times more potent than a trip to Mars, for example. In our energy hungry modern world the prospect seems fanciful, yet we are surrounded by energies and forces of comparable scale. By taming those forces we will be able to launch forth towards the stars and save our civilization and our biosphere. How so? Consider the sunlight received every second by planet Earth, from the Sun. About 1.4 kilowatts of energy for every square metre directly facing…
  • A Plumber’s Guide to Starships, Part 3 – Thermal Properties of Materials

    Michel Lamontagne
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Materials are the bedrock upon which we can build starship designs. Outside of science fiction, there is no use postulating a starship drive that requires materials that do not, or cannot, exist. So this article is about materials: what they can do, what we hope future materials can do, and what we expect materials to never be able to do. Figure 1- Roman clay pipes. Modern vitrified clay pipes. Alumina ceramic pipes and linings. 2000 years of progress in materials. For a Starship plumber, the question boils down to: “What’s the best material for my pipes?” And the answer is the…
  • Introducing Project Voyager – Interstellar Trajectory and Mission Planning Tool

    Andreas Tziolas
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:58 pm
      It is my pleasure to introduce you to Icarus’s latest research project: Project Voyager Voyager will be led by Project Leader Zach Fejes (zfejes@icarusinterstellar.org), who has built a team of Engineers, Physicists and coders, with objective to design a 2d/3d interstellar trajectory and mission planning tool from the ground up. Many of us met Zach at Starship Congress last year, where he stood out as a highly motivated and capable new recruit. The Toronto based team of 14 reearchers so far have already settled in and are working on Euler vs 4th order Runge Kutta approximations of…
  • Introducing Project Astrolabe – Navigating the Future of Civilization

    Andreas Tziolas
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:47 am
    [logo for Project Astrolabe by J. N. Nielsen] Project Astrolabe: Navigating the Future of Civilization J. N. Nielsen Introducing Project Astrolabe Icarus Interstellar will be adding Project Astrolabe to its programs, which will be concerned with the core issues of civilization’s evolution, longevity, and existential risk. It will be the purpose of Project Astrolabe to bring to the study of civilization in the universe the same active engagement that Icarus Interstellar brings to the design of interstellar spacecraft, and in so doing to shed light on the place of human civilization in the…
  • A Starship Worth Fighting For

    Andreas Tziolas
    25 Jun 2014 | 3:07 am
    There’s a ship out there without a name. Its been thought of by millions, conceived of, drawn, designed and re-imagined over and over. Some hold strongly to have thought of it first. Others profess to having built it. Others lay claim to the origins of the idea. This is a ship without a name. But we all know what it is, and where its going. It will travel through interstellar space. It will be headed to a nearby star system. It will carry with it over two thousand years of dreams, …and we would like it to look something like this:   This is Mark Rademaker’s IXS-Enterprise…
 
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    AmericaSpace

  • NASA’s SMAP Mission Arrives At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Begins Final Preparations For Early 2015 Launch

    Leonidas Papadopoulos
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:30 pm
    Scheduled for launch in early 2015, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP mission, will track Earth’s water into one of its last hiding places: the soil. SMAP soil moisture data will, among other things, aid in predictions of agricultural productivity, weather and climate. Image Credit: NASA ‘Follow the water': This theme has driven [...]
  • Saturn’s Moon Mimas May Have an Underground Ocean – or Just a Weird Core

    Paul Scott Anderson
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:58 pm
    Mimas, a cold, icy and tiny moon of Saturn, may have a liquid water ocean below its heavily cratered surface. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI It wasn’t that long ago that Earth was thought to be the only place in the Solar System capable of having liquid water oceans, but now we know of several moons [...]
  • Russian Cosmonauts Breeze Through Four-Hour EVA

    Ben Evans
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:21 pm
    Max Surayev (bottom) and Aleksandr Samokutyayev (top) at the Pirs airlock during their EVA on Wednesday, 22 October. Photo Credit: NASA For the seventh time in 2014—and the third occasion in less than three weeks—a pair of spacewalkers toiled outside the International Space Station (ISS) earlier today (Wednesday, 22 October). Expedition 41 Commander Max [...]
  • ESA Announces Landing Site Naming Contest as Rosetta Gets Best Comet Views

    Ken Kremer
    21 Oct 2014 | 9:20 am
    ESA and its Rosetta mission partners are inviting you to suggest a name for the site where lander Philae will touch down on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 12 November. Credit: ESA Calling all space enthusiasts! Here’s your chance to participate in Europe’s breathtaking Rosetta comet mission with a ringside seat for history’s first-ever attempt to [...]
  • NASA’s Opportunity Rover Snaps First-Ever Comet Image From Mars’ Surface During Comet’s Ultra-Close Martian Flyby

    Ken Kremer
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:11 pm
    NASA’s Opportunity rover snaps this first-ever image of a comet (fuzzy object at center) from another planet’s surface during close flyby of Comet Siding Spring with Mars on Oct. 19, 2014. This pancam raw image was taken on Sol 3817. Inset shows enhanced view revealing more comet detail. Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU/TAMU. Image Processing: Marco Di [...]
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    Space Industry News

  • Cassini Watches Mysterious Feature Evolve in Titan Sea

    William W.
    29 Sep 2014 | 5:05 pm
    NASA‘s Cassini spacecraft is monitoring the evolution of a mysterious feature in a large hydrocarbon sea on Saturn’s moon Titan. The feature covers an area of about 100 square miles (260 square kilometers) in Ligeia Mare, one of the largest seas on Titan. It has now been observed twice by Cassini’s radar experiment, but its appearance changed between the two apparitions. Images of the feature taken during the Cassini flybys are available at: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18430 The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark…
  • Hubble Telescope finds steamy water vapour on a planet outside our Solar System

    William W.
    24 Sep 2014 | 8:27 pm
    Astronomers using data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Kepler Space Telescope have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapour on a planet outside our Solar System. The planet, known as HAT-P-11b, is about the size of Neptune, making it the smallest exoplanet ever on which water vapour has been detected. The results will appear in the online version of the journal Nature on 24 September 2014. The discovery is a milestone on the road to eventually finding molecules in the atmospheres of smaller, rocky planets more akin to Earth. Clouds in the…
  • Stone Aerospace Tests Third Generation Of Europa Oceanic Probe Hardware: VALKYRIE

    bert
    23 Sep 2014 | 11:22 am
    On Matanuska Glacier in Alaska in June of 2014, Stone Aerospace/PSC, Inc. completed successful tests of a scaled down version of a robotic probe, the full sized edition of which will ultimately penetrate the ice on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. Named VALKYRIE (Very-deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer), the laser powered prototype set a record in melting it’s way through 30 meters of ice. VALKYRIE’s full sized incarnation will carry a pay load of autonomous deep sea explorer robots which will investigate the ocean that scientists…
  • Big Bang theory may be wrong according to new study

    William W.
    10 Sep 2014 | 11:44 am
    This new image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in northern Chile shows a vast collection of stars, the globular cluster Messier 54. This cluster looks very similar to many others but it has a secret. Messier 54 doesn’t belong to the Milky Way, but is part of a small satellite galaxy, the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy. This unusual parentage has now allowed astronomers to use the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to test whether there are also unexpectedly low levels of the element lithium in stars outside the Milky Way. The Milky Way galaxy is orbited by more than 150…
  • Hubble Finds Supernova Companion Star after Two Decades of Searching

    William W.
    9 Sep 2014 | 5:53 pm
    Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a companion star to a rare type of supernova. The discovery confirms a long-held theory that the supernova, dubbed SN 1993J, occurred inside what is called a binary system, where two interacting stars caused a cosmic explosion. “This is like a crime scene, and we finally identified the robber,” said Alex Filippenko, professor of astronomy at University of California (UC) at Berkeley. “The companion star stole a bunch of hydrogen before the primary star exploded.” SN 1993J is an example of a Type IIb…
 
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    Space Facts

  • Mars Characteristics

    Chris
    13 Oct 2014 | 3:04 pm
    Size, Mass & Gravity Mars is an Earth-like planet in many ways, but it does vary in size and gravitational pull. From spacecraft and telescope observations, planetary scientists know that it smaller and less massive than Earth. Its mass is 0.107 Earth masses and its gravity is about 62 percent less than Earth’s gravitational tug. […] The post Mars Characteristics appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Mars Features

    Chris
    28 Sep 2014 | 9:23 am
    Olympus Mons – Mars’ Volcano Mars has the largest volcano in the solar system – Olympus Mons. It measures some 600 kilometres across and rises nearly 27 kilometres above the surrounding terrain. It is a shield volcano built by the continuous action of flowing lava over millions and millions of years that began some 3 billion […] The post Mars Features appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Pictures of Comets

    Chris
    17 Sep 2014 | 1:36 pm
    The post Pictures of Comets appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Oort Cloud Facts

    Chris
    9 Sep 2014 | 2:34 pm
    What is the Oort Cloud? The Oort Cloud is an extended shell of icy objects that exist in the outermost reaches of the solar system. It is named after astronomer Jan Oort, who first theorized its existence. The Oort Cloud is roughly spherical, and is the origin of most of the long-period comets that have […] The post Oort Cloud Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
  • Kuiper Belt Facts

    Chris
    2 Sep 2014 | 12:05 pm
    What is the Kuiper Belt? The Kuiper Belt (sometimes referred to as the Kuiper-Edgeworth Belt) is an area of the outer solar system that is estimated to stretch across 20 astronomical units (AU) of space. It contains small solar system bodies made mostly of ices. The ices are frozen volatiles (gases) such as methane, ammonia, […] The post Kuiper Belt Facts appeared first on Space Facts.
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    Space Safety Magazine

  • Disaster Playground: The Edge of Space Fiction with Nelly Ben Hayoun

    Nikita Marwaha
    14 Oct 2014 | 12:57 am
    You might have heard of French director and designer of experiences Nelly Ben Hayoun from her past creative concoctions such as the International Space Orchestra and her musical collaboration in space with Beck and Bobby Womack. Designing immersive experiences is her forté and her latest creation, Disaster Playground, is no exception. This creative platform explores... Read more → The post Disaster Playground: The Edge of Space Fiction with Nelly Ben Hayoun from Nikita Marwaha appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • IAASS “Safety Is No Accident” Conference to Kickoff October 20

    Staff Writers
    13 Oct 2014 | 1:46 pm
    On October 20, the 7th International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS) Conference kicks off in Friedrichshafen, Germany. The three-day conference, entitled “Space Safety Is No Accident,” features speakers from around the world, come to exchange information and promote mutual understanding on space safety topics of general international concern. Today’s space is a... Read more → The post IAASS “Safety Is No Accident” Conference to Kickoff October 20 from Staff Writers appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • EIAST: The United Arab Emirates Space Program

    Hubert Foy
    13 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    There are dozens of emerging space nations around the world seeking to capitalize on dramatic increases in space technology accessibility. We take a look at one such nation, the United Arab Emirates, exploring the opportunities and challenges they face on the road to achieving space capability. Entry of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) into the... Read more → The post EIAST: The United Arab Emirates Space Program from Hubert Foy appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • No Romance on Mars: Sex and Romance in a Mission to the Red Planet

    Tereza Pultarova
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:12 am
    Imagine the following scenario. The first batch of Martian colonists has settled on Mars. There are only ten of them currently residing on the Red Planet, both men and women, living together in a confined station only a few meters across. They see each other first thing in the morning, they share their meals, they... Read more → The post No Romance on Mars: Sex and Romance in a Mission to the Red Planet from Tereza Pultarova appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
  • SpaceX Wins Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award

    Staff Writers
    6 Oct 2014 | 9:05 am
    The International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety has announced that this year’s Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award will go to Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) for safety accomplishments related to its Dragon vehicle. The award will be received at the 7th IAASS Conference Awards Gala Dinner by SpaceX Director of Risk and System Safety Michael Lutomski.... Read more → The post SpaceX Wins Vladimir Syromiatnikov Safety-by-Design Award from Staff Writers appeared first on Space Safety Magazine.
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    Latest UFO sightings

  • UFO sighting above San Francisco on 11th October 2014

    admin
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:37 pm
    New amazing video footage of an amazing UFO sighting recorded above San Francisco on 11th October 2014. Witness said: San Francisco, California – 10-11-14 – I was watching Blue Angels with 100’s of people on rooftops. I used my iPhone 6 to shoot several slow-mo videos. I never got them quite right above me.  5 days […]
  • UFO sighting over Petaluma, California in October 2014

    admin
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:34 pm
    New amazing video footage of a UFO sighting recorded over Petaluma, California in October 2014. Witness said: I thought they were airplanes at first, but they were too close and crossing paths. I pulled the car over and recorded them on my iPhone 5 with the highest zoom.
  • Videos Of The UFO Experience 2014

    admin
    21 Oct 2014 | 3:10 pm
    A tremendous surge in activity the last few weeks has enabled me to post this series once again. Some of the most interesting uploads over the last 2 months can be found on this video. Everything featured can be located below inside the description box.. Thank you all for replying to my messages allowing me […]
  • UFO sighting over Atmore, Alabama on 5th October 2014

    admin
    21 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    New amazing video footage of a bright disk – shaped UFO recorded in the daytime sky above Atmore, Alabama on 5th October 2014.
  • UFO sighting over Charlotte, North Carolina on 11th October 2014

    admin
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:57 pm
    New amazing video footage of a UFO sighting recorded in the night sky above Charlotte, North Carolina on 11th October 2014.
 
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